Sanitation & Safety in The Salon Spa Setting

Course Hours: 2, Eligibility: Cosmetologists (C), Estheticians (E), Manicurists (M), Teachers (T)/Instructors (I)

This Course is Offered to Licensees in North Carolina

Note: *Please take the allotted time for this 2 hr. course to read, reflect, and retain the information.  After you read through your course for the allotted 2 hrs., you can take and submit your end-of-course exam at the bottom.  Please include your name, license number and contact information at the beginning of your end-of-course exam. At the end of your exam, please press the "submit" button to submit your exam.  We will then email your exam results and course completion certificate within the same business day. If your exam is submitted after 7:00 p.m., we will email your results the next business day. Thank you and if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at 919-672-4698, or email at SalonSpaTraining@aol.com(Note: Our online CE courses have  a timer/timing element; but it is presently being rebooted for our system, and will be up soon. Therefore, this is an alternative way you can take your online CE course.  Thank you for your patience, and we hope you enjoy your course!).

*NOTE: AFTER YOU REGISTER/PAY FOR YOUR COURSE, YOU MUST READ THIS COURSE FOR THE 2hr. REQUIREMENT. PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT YOUR END-OF-COURSE EXAM UNTIL 2hs. AFTER YOUR COURSE PAYMENT. 

  • This is a 2-hour, 120-minute course. There is no passing grade for this 2-hr. online course. However, the course curriculum must be read and you are required to take the end-of-course exam, and make your course payment to receive an official course completion certificate.
  • Please make sure you “keep current” with the N.C. Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners (State Board) rules regarding your license renewal. The State Board Website is: www.nccosmeticarts.com, and they are the “official” Body which conveys Continuing Education and License Renewal laws, rules, policies, and procedures.
  • The end-of-course exam has a total of 20 True/False questions that derive from all course Modules. There is no passing score for the exam, but please answer each question to the best of your ability. You have up to 60 minutes to complete the course exam. If you finish in less than 60 minutes, you will not be penalized.
  • Upon your (1) taking this online course, (2) submitting your end-of-course exam, and (3) course our receipt of your course payment – you will then receive an emailed course completion certificate the same business day.  If you complete your course and submit your exam after 7:00 p.m. (EST), you will receive your emailed results and course completion certificate the next business day. This certificate is your official notification of course completion. Please also make sure you pay for your course by visiting www.SalonSpaTraining.com and clicking the “Online/Internet/Correspondence Course Registration” link.
  • Please keep a record of your emailed course completion certificate – as State Board no longer requires CE Providers to submit hours directly to the Board. Licensees are now responsible for the record keeping of their hours (as Continuing Education Providers are responsible for maintaining your course completion hours as well).You have up to 30 days to complete this Online course. 
 *Lesson Objective: This course is designed as a 2-hour Online (Internet-based) or Correspondence course which focuses on – sanitation, cleanliness, and the safety of the salon and/or spa setting. In greater detail, this proposed course focuses on two (II) Modules which highlight: (I) the definition of sanitation and the various levels of decontamination; as well as the discussion of pathogens, micro-organisms, and disease-causing elements; (II) regulations regarding material safety data, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Occupational Safety & Health Administration; and State Boards of Cosmetology. The conclusion will also include tips & checklists that can aid professionals in the beauty industry in providing a more safe and sanitary salon spa setting; as well as N.C. Sub Chapter 14H rules regarding Sanitation. *Course Goals:  * To Educate course participants about the various forms of decontamination and sanitation, and to encourage participants to implement sanitation procedures at all times.* To discuss in greater detail pathogens, germs, and disease-causing organisms.* To inform course participants regarding safety measures in the salon or spa setting, and to encourage a proactive approach to safety measures.* To discuss laws and regulations that may be enforced by State Boards of Cosmetology; as well as Federal Agencies and Administrations (such as OSHA and EPA).* To provide a checklist that may assist beauty professionals in regard to using “best practices” regarding safety and sanitation.* To serve as a refresher regarding sanitation basic principles, and to remind course participants to keep up with current laws and legislation (regarding salon sanitation and safety).    
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MODULE I: SANITATION – “THE DEFINITIONAL FRAME” The beauty industry has long been known as an industry that provides services to the public, and some of these service areas include [and are limited to] cosmetology, esthetics, and manicuring services respectively.  Overall, various services include cosmetic art, and the grooming, care and maintenance of the hair, skin, nails; and [again], these services are open to the public. *****Licensed beauty professionals – such as cosmetologists, estheticians, and manicurists perform the aforementioned services, and it is important to make sure that the clients, beauty professionals, and the health and safety of the salon or spa setting is monitored.  Therefore, it is imperative that safety and sanitation standards are a top priority in regarding to the salon or spa operation.****        
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In the United States, there are over 300 million people, and there are over 1.6  million Salon and Spa professionals employed in the Beauty Industry.  As persons receive professional grooming and spa services; whether a necessity or a luxury – it is imperative that Beauty Industry Professionals follow various sanitation & safety procedures, to protect the client, the beauty professional, and the salon/spa as a whole.    ********
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According to The National Accrediting Commission of Cosmetology Arts and Sciences (NACCAS), a statistical report prepared by John B. Lee in 2007, cited that [again] there are over 1.6 million beauty professionals employed in the United States. These beauty professionals comprise of: cosmetologists, barbers, nail technicians, and skin care specialists.  The report also cites that there are over 370,000 beauty establishments, which include: beauty salons, “skin care salons,” nail salons and barber shops. The average number of stations within these beauty establishments was approximately 5, and the beauty establishments cited an average of 127 clients per week. Additionally, the report cited that nearly 60% of the beauty establishments were considered as “full-service salons.”*****
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Therefore, with 370,000 beauty establishments in various States, there are rules and regulations that focus on sanitation & safety in the salon and spa settings.  Although there is no one universal State rule of incorporating sanitation and safety, there are various organizations, that encompass multiple State Boards of Cosmetology, to ensure that there is discussion and understanding of issues and trends in Cosmetic Art practices, including sanitation and safety issues.  NIC, the National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology, is one such organization.  *****
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State Boards and regulatory agencies are very stringent on making certain that professionals in the beauty industry use precaution in regard to cleanliness and sanitary salon and spa environments. It is an overall goal of making sure that there is control of contamination upon all levels in the salon setting. It is an overall goal of making sure that there is control of contamination upon all levels in the salon setting.  Ultimately, if something is soiled, tainted, or infected – it can be considered “contaminated.” Therefore, decontamination is imperative for a safe, healthy salon and concerning microdermabrasion – it is important to make certain that the treatment room is decontaminated.      
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*The control of “Pathogens” are imperative in the salon and spa settings, and pathogens are disease-causing microorganisms that can cause contamination.  In order to control pathogens, surfaces – living or non-living, and implements must be decontaminated.  An example of a “living” surface is the client or the beauty professional’s hands. Throughout the day, services offered by beauty professionals are performed with the hands; and in turn, clients enter the salon and spa environments and touch items with their hands – such as opening doors, touching chairs, and touching appointment and retail counters are a few examples.  ******
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Ultimately, there are three (3) types of decontamination which include sterilization, disinfection, and sanitation:******
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Sterilization – This is the very highest level of decontamination, and it is mostly associated with hospital-grade decontamination.  The sterilization process destroys all living organisms related to a surface or an object. However, the chemicals, products, and processes utilized in sterilization are not appropriate for salon settings.  They are not appropriate because there are dangers involved and the chemicals could damage skin and cause harm to your eyes, and the like. Therefore, sterilization is [again] not appropriate for the salon and spa settings.        
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However, there are various types of salons and spas which might warrant sterilization procedures.  For instance, if a Medical Spa has medical-grade and spa-grade services, traditionally – the “medical side” and the “spa side” may be separate (such as by a dividing wall throughout both sides). However, this medical spa may employ Cosmetologists and Estheticians, as well as medical professionals such as Registered Nurses, Licensed Practical Nurses, Physicians, and the like.  Therefore, there may be some forms of sterilization practices that take place.   
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The next level of decontamination is disinfection – The disinfectionprocess is the second highest level of decontamination, because it controls microorganisms that grow on various implements used in the salon setting such as metal extractors, and metal cuticle pushers  – which are known as “non-living surfaces.” The chemical products used in disinfection often have strong chemical properties and need to be used safely. Therefore, you must follow safety rules documented by the manufacturer of the disinfectant product. Safety rules are published on the Material Safety Data Sheet, or the – “MSDS.”  Later in Module III, there will be a greater discussion of MSDS sheets, and their mission and purpose.  
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In the salon setting, the disinfection: of bacteria, viruses, tuberculocides and fungicides are crucial.  Therefore, an EPA registered, hospital-level disinfection is used to disinfect by killing bactericides, virucides, and fungicides. The “EPA” stands for the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and their primary mission is to: “. . . protect human health and the environment . . .” and to “. . . lead the nation's environmental science, research, education and assessment efforts.”  There will be greater discussion regarding the EPA in Module III, as there will be regarding OSHA – the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration, and the FDA – the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.   Sanitation is the lowest level of decontamination in the salon setting, however, it is still very important. Sanitation can help to reduce pathogens on living and non-living surfaces [again] such as your hands (living), and your salon floor (non-living). If you are using an antiseptic on your hands, that is an example of sanitation. If you are washing your towels and linens, that is a form of sanitation (as long as the water temperature is appropriate according to State Board regulatory standards). If you are sweeping the floor, that is a form of sanitation.  Therefore, sanitation is important as well and can oftentimes be associated with the daily cleaning routine of a salon. Please make sure that you follow sanitation rules and guidelines, according to your State Board rules, regulations, and standards.  The North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners also has an updated sanitation guideline (Subchapter 14H) – in which a direct insert of the NC Sanitation Regulations update will be provided for supplementary course reading and content. 
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The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS), Blood Spills, Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS): Material Safety Data Sheets are required by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the following information should be included, which highlights the product, the contents, or the product, and how the product should be handled in the workplace setting (direct exert from OSHA):“ . . . Identification, Hazard(s) identification, Composition/information on ingredients, First-aid measures , Fire-fighting measures , Accidental release measures , Handling and storage, Exposure controls/personal protection, Physical and chemical properties, Stability and reactivity, Toxicological information, Ecological information, Disposal considerations, Transport information, Regulatory information, Other information.”
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  • Salons and Spas should also create a MSDS book, which includes a listing of all disinfectants and salon-based products that require an MSDS.  This book will serve as a central resource, in which all employees and/or independent contractors can have access. It is also appropriate for all persons working at a salon or spa to review and discuss the MSDS book as well.  This can help with preventative measures regarding accidents that can happen with various chemical products. 
  • It should also be known where the Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) booklet is located in your salon spa setting.  First, it is important because if there are any emergencies or measures which require first aid – the MSDS book will be readily available for emergency workers/paramedics (if necessary), and for salon spa employees as well.  The location of the MSDS book can be identified at a weekly meeting, or it can be a memo to your staff.  It should be noted that physically showing your salon spa team is wise – so each and every person will be able to retrieve the MSDS book when necessary. Additionally, when there are new MSDS sheets inserted in the book, it should be mentioned to the salon spa staff as well.  Overall, it is wise for all salon spa employees to read and analyze the entire MSDS book, which will allow a better understanding the product ingredients, side effects, and contraindications as well.
  • Another safety strategy is to divide your MSDS book into two parts: the “salon spa product side” and the “cleaners and disinfectant side.” Not only are products used in Cosmetic Art for Cosmetology, Manicuring, Esthetics, and Natural Hair Braiding needs – there are also cleaners and disinfectants that are used as well.  In order to practice sanitation, there must be means of cleaning and EPA-registered disinfectants, bleach, and other cleaning products may be used. 
  • Also, from a technology perspective, many of the MSDS can be downloaded from online, and the manufacturer of your salon spa product should be able to either:  postal mail, email, fax, or direct you to an online resource, in which you can retrieve your MSDS. 
  • Additionally, regarding insurance applications for hazard and liability insurance for your salon spa – Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS) are excellent for the recording and documentation of all the products, supplies, and procedures within your Salon Spa. Usually, when you apply to insure your salon spa business, you have to record all service menu items that are offered (such as facials, chemical peels, microdermabrasion, body wraps, waxing; hair color, hair extensions, cutting, relaxers; manicures, pedicures, artificial nail extensions, paraffin wax dip, etc.); as well as the products that are included within your service (such as a 25% non-buffered glycolic peel). Therefore, to utilize your MSDS book as a reference for your insurance application is very efficient.
 Blood Spills & Safety in the Salon Spa Setting – There may be an instance where a blood spill may occur within the salon setting.  With spa pedicures, the spill may occur from a filing technique on the toe nails, or from a cuticle procedure that might cut the cuticle. Additionally, an extraction from a facial could erode and there could be blood that can land on the extractor.  According the National-Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology, there is an “NIC Health and Safety Standards Blood Spill Procedure”, and below is a copy of their official handout which is also available at www.nictesting.org/testing.htm(Note: In the steps below, the “candidate” is the Beauty Professional and the “model’ is the Client.) 
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NIC HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS BLOOD SPILL PROCEDURE (Direct Insert)If a blood spill should occur, the following steps MUST be followed:SUPPLY INJURED PARTY WITH LIQUID STYPTIC/ANTISEPTIC AND THE APPROPRIATE DRESSING TO COVER THE INJURY. DOUBLE BAG ALL BLOOD-SOILED (CONTAMINATED) ARTICLES AND LABEL WITH RED OR ORANGE BIOHAZARD WARNING. 
This is the responsibility of the candidate and should be executed as follows:   CANDIDATE INJURY – PROTECTION – If a cut is sustained, stop the service and clean the injured area.
APPLY antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic as appropriate (see NOTE).
DRESSING - cover the injury with the appropriate dressing.
COVER injured area with finger guard or glove as appropriate.
CLEAN model/client and station as appropriate.
DOUBLE BAG and dispose of all contaminated objects. 
Clean hands with antimicrobial cleanser.
RETURN to service.  
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MODEL INJURY –
STOP service.
GLOVE hands of candidate/student/licensee.
CLEAN injured area as appropriate.
APPLY antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic as appropriate (see NOTE).
COVER the injury with the appropriate dressing to prevent further blood exposure.
DOUBLE BAG and dispose of all contaminated objects.  Clean hands with antimicrobial cleanser.
RETURN to service. MODEL INJURY – STOP service.
GLOVE hands of candidate/student/licensee.
CLEAN injured area as appropriate.
APPLY antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic as appropriate (see NOTE).
COVER the injury with the appropriate dressing to prevent further blood exposure.
DOUBLE BAG and dispose of all contaminated objects. 
Clean hands with antimicrobial cleanser.
RETURN to service.  
NOTE:  DO NOT ALLOW CONTAINERS, BRUSHES, NOZZLES OR LIQUID STYPTIC TO TOUCH THE SKIN OR CONTACT THE WOUND.  USE AN APPLICATOR.  EXAMINERS SHOULD ALSO COMPLETE AN INCIDENT REPORT. 
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WET DISINFECTION STANDARD 1 All tools and implements, EXCEPT THOSE THAT HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS must be disinfected, at minimum, by complete immersion in an EPA registered, bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, and   pseudomonacidal (Formulated for Hospitals) disinfectant that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer’s directions.2 All tools and implements WHICH HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS must be disinfected, at  minimum, by complete immersion in anEPA registered disinfectant that is effective against HIV-1 and human Hepatitis B Virus or Tuberculocidal that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer’s directions.DRY STORAGE STANDARDDisinfected implements must be stored in a disinfected, dry, covered container and be isolated from contaminants.
HAND WASHING(Anti-Bacterial Soap is recommended)Thoroughly wash hands and the exposed portions of arms with antibacterial soap and water before providing services to each client and after smoking, drinking, eating, and using the restroom.  
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Additional Recommended Sanitation Techniques:
  • You should also make sure that your disposable items, such as cotton balls, orangewood sticks, plastic spatulas and the like should be thrown away. 
  • The cotton towels used in cosmetic art practices – in the areas of Cosmetology, Esthetics, Manicuring, and Natural Hair Braiding should also be laundered per the State Regulatory Board requirements.
  • Also, your metal implements should be disinfected immediately.  Don’t forget to wash and brush your implements with warm, soapy water and to dry them as well. Make sure that your disinfection solution is mixed with water – per the manufacturer’s instructions and that extractors, cuticle nippers, metal pushers, toe nail clippers, etc. are immersed in the solution properly (you can refer to the Sanitation & Disinfection appendix [before the end-of-course exam] for further detail).
  • Another form of post-service sanitation includes your spraying and wiping your spa chair or spa bed, manicure table and/or pedicure cart table top, the pedicurist’s stool, spa professional’s stool (if applicable), the client’s chair, and pedicure basin foot rests with an EPA registered disinfectant.
 Sanitation & Clean Up – As mentioned earlier, sanitation is important before and after cosmetic art services. Please note [again] requirements by the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners, in regard to Sub-chapter 14H – Sanitation Rules and Regulations: 
SUBCHAPTER 14H ‑ SANITATION SECTION .0100 - SANITATION 21 NCAC 14H .0101          COPY OF RULES TO COSMETOLOGY STUDENTS Cosmetic art schools shall give a copy of the sanitation rules governing the practice of the cosmetic arts to each student for study.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; 88‑30; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. April 1, 1991; January 1, 1989.21 NCAC 14H .0102         
COPY OF RULES TO BEAUTY ESTABLISHMENTS The Board shall give copies of the rules of sanitation governing the practice of cosmetic art to all beauty establishments.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; 88‑30; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. April 1, 1991; January 1, 1989. 21 NCAC 14H .0103          FAILURE TO ADHERE TO RULES 21 NCAC 14H .0104          BUILDING History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Repealed Eff. January 1, 1989.21 NCAC 14H .0105         
SANITARY RATINGS AND POSTING OF RATINGS (a)  The sanitary rating of a beauty establishment shall be based on a system of grading outlined in this Subchapter.  Based on the grading, all establishments shall be rated in the following manner:
(1) all establishments receiving a rating of at least 90 percent or more, shall be awarded a grade A;
(2) all establishments receiving a rating of at least 80 percent, and less than 90 percent, shall be awarded grade B;
(3) all establishments receiving a rating of at least 70 percent or more, and less than 80 shall be awarded grade C.
(b)  Every beauty establishment shall be given a sanitary rating.  A cosmetic art school shall be graded no less than three times a year, and a cosmetic art shop shall be graded once a year.
(c)  The sanitary rating given to a beauty establishment shall be posted in a conspicuous place at all times.
(d) All new establishments must receive a rating of at least 90 percent before a license will be issued.
(e) The willful operation of a beauty establishment which fails to receive a sanitary rating of at least 70 percent (grade C) shall be sufficient cause for revoking or suspending the letter of approval or permit.
(f) A re-inspection for the purpose of raising the sanitary rating of a beauty establishment shall not be given within 30 days of the last inspection, unless the rating at the last inspection was less than 80 percent.
(g) A whirlpool and footspa sanitation record must be kept on each whirlpool and footspa for inspection on a form provided by the Board.
History Note:  Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-23; 88B-24; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. January 1, 2011; June 1, 2009; June 1, 2007; August 1, 1998; June 1, 1994; April 1, 1991; January 1, 1989.   21 NCAC 14H .0106         
RESIDENTIAL BEAUTY SHOPS History Note:  Authority G.S. 88‑23;’ Eff. February 1, 1976; Repealed Eff. January 1, 1989. 21 ncac 14H .0107         
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WATER SUPPLY:
(a)  A beauty establishment shall have a supply of running hot and cold water in the clinic area, approved by the local health department.
(b)  When a service is provided in a room closed off by a door, the water supply required in this Rule must be within 20 feet of the door or 25 feet from the service table or chair.  The restroom sink shall not be used to meet this requirement.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88B-4; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. January 1, 2011; September 1, 2004; January 1, 1989. 21 NCAC 14H .0108         
FLOOR COVERINGS All floor coverings shall be washable and kept clean and in good repair. History Note:        Authority G.S. 88-23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. February 1, 2006; December 1, 2004; June 1, 1994. 21 NCAC 14H .0109         
VENTILATION AND LIGHT
(a)  All doors and windows shall be kept clean and, if open for ventilation, effectively screened.
(b)  Necessary ventilation shall be provided at all times.  In the clinic areas of all cosmetic art schools and in the areas where patrons are serviced in all cosmetic art shops, there must be an adequate, continuous exchange of air.
(c)  Adequate light shall be provided for each operator.History Note: Authority G.S. 88‑23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. April 1, 1991; April 1, 1988.
21 NCAC 14H .0110         
BATHROOM FACILITIES
(a)  Toilet and hand washing facilities consisting of at least one commode and one lavatory with hot and cold running water, liquid soap and individual towels shall be provided.
(b)  A residential beauty salon shall furnish bathroom facilities separate and apart from the residence.History Note: Authority G.S. 88B-4(a)(9); Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. July 1, 2010; June 1, 1994; January 1, 1989; April 1, 1988.  
21 NCAC 14H .0111          CLEANLINESS OF OPERATORS
(a)  All operators and students shall be personally clean and neat.
(b)  Every person employed in a beauty establishment shall wear clean, washable outer garments with sleeves while serving patrons.
(c)  Each licensee and student shall wash his or her hands with soap and water or an equally effective cleansing agent immediately before and after serving each client.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-14; Eff. February 1, 1976;, Amended Eff. December 1, 2008; January 1, 2008; June 1, 1994. 21 NCAC 14H .0112          CLEANLINESS OF CLINIC AREA
(a)  The clinic area shall be kept clean.
(b)  Waste material shall be kept in covered receptacles.  The area surrounding the waste receptacles shall be maintained in a neat and sanitary manner.
(c)  Sanitation rules which apply to towels and cloths are as follows:(1) Separate and clean protective drapes, linens and towels shall be used for each patron.
(2)  After a protective cape, drape, linen or towel has been used once, it shall be placed in a clean, closed container until laundered.  Any paper or nonwoven protective drape or covering shall be discarded after one use.
(3)  There shall be an adequate supply of clean protective drapes, linens and towels at all times.
(4)  All plastic capes used on patrons shall not be allowed to come in contact with the patron's neck.
(5)  Clean drapes, linens and towels shall be stored in a covered receptacle when not in use.
(d)  At least six combs and brushes shall be provided for each cosmetology operator and cosmetology student.
(e)  All combs, brushes, and implements shall be cleaned and disinfected after each use in the following manner:
(1)  They shall be soaked in a cleaning solution that will not leave a residue and, if necessary, scrubbed. 
(2)  They shall be disinfected in accordance with the following:
(A)  EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) or tuberculocidal, that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer's directions; or(B)  1 and 1/3 cup of 5.25 percent household bleach to one gallon of water for 10 minutes.The disinfectant shall not shorten the service life of the comb, brush, esthetics or manicuring instrument. In using a disinfectant, the user shall wear any personal protective equipment, such as gloves, recommended in the Material Safety Data Sheet prepared on the disinfectant manufacturer.(3) They shall be rinsed with hot tap water and dried with a clean towel before their next use.  They shall be stored in a clean, closed cabinet or container until they are needed.(f)  Disposable and porous implements must be discarded after use or upon completion of the service.
(g)  Product that comes into contact with the patron must be discarded upon completion of the service.
(h)  Clean items and items needing to be disinfected shall be kept in separate containers.
(i)  A covered receptacle may have an opening so soiled items may be dropped into the receptacle.History Note: Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-14; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. June 1, 1994; April 1, 1991; January 1, 1989; April 1, 1988; Temporary Amendment Eff. January 20, 1999; Amended Eff. January 1, 2011; December 1, 2008; October 1, 2006; November 1, 2005; August 1, 2000.  21 NCAC 14H .0113         
CLEANLINESS OF SCISSORS: SHEARS: RAZORS AND OTHER EQUIPMENT
(a)  All scissors, shears, razors, and other metal instruments must be cleaned and disinfected after each use in the following manner:
(1)  If the implement is not immersible, it shall be cleaned by wiping it with a moistened clean cloth and disinfected with a disinfectant used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, that states the solution will destroy HIV, TB or HBV viruses and approved by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.(2)           If it is immersible, it shall be disinfected by immersion and whenever it comes in contact with blood, with:
(A) disinfectant, used in accordance with the manufacturer's instructions, that states the solution will destroy HIV, TB or HBV viruses and approved by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency.
(B) EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) or tuberculocidal, that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer's directions; or(C) household bleach in a 10 percent solution for 10 minutes.
3) If the implement is not used immediately after cleaning, it must be stored in a clean, closed cabinet until it is needed.
(b)  Furniture, equipment and fixtures must be of a washable material and kept clean and in good repair.
(c)  Lancets, disposable razors, and other sharp objects shall be disposed in puncture-resistant containers.
History Note: Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-14; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. April 1, 2011; December 1, 2008; January 1, 2008; October 1, 2006; February 1, 2004; August 1, 1998; June 1, 1994; January 1, 1989; April 1, 1988.
21 NCAC 14H .0114    CARE OF CREAMS: LOTIONS: AND COSMETICS All creams, lotions, and other cosmetics used for patrons must be kept in clean, closed containers, and must conform in all respects to the requirements of the Pure Food and Drug Law.  Lotions, or fluids must be poured into a clean glass or other sanitized container and applied to patrons by means of cotton or other sanitized methods.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. January 1, 1989.
21 NCAC 14H .0115          FIRST AID Each beauty establishment must have antiseptics and other necessary supplies available to provide first aid when necessary.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. January 1, 1989.
21 NCAC 14H .0116          HEALTH OF OPERATORS History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; 88‑26(3); Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. January 1, 1989; Repealed Eff. December 1, 2008.  21 NCAC 14H .0117          ANIMALS Animals or birds shall not be in a beauty establishment.  Trained animals accompanying disabled persons are exempt.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-17; 88B-23; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. July 1, 2010; December 1, 2008.
21 NCAC 14H .0118          SYSTEMS OF GRADING BEAUTY ESTABLISHMENTS The system of grading the sanitary rating of cosmetic art schools and shops based on the rules set out in 21 NCAC 14H .0106 to .0117 shall be as follows, setting out areas to be inspected and considered, and the maximum points given for compliance:
(1)           clean and repaired entrance and reception room                                                                          2;
(2)           general condition of the entire establishment                                                                                8;
(3)           water system; hot and cold running water                                                                                    2;
(4)           walls, ceiling and floors:
(A)          construction and coverings                                                                                                           4;
(B)          clean                                                                                                                                             4;
(C)          good repair                                                                                                                                   3;
(5)           lighting and fresh continuous ventilation (windows included); their adequacy and cleanliness                                                                                                                                             3;
(6) public toilet:
(A)          clean and ventilated                                                                                                               5;
(B)          liquid soap and individual towels furnished                                                                          5;
(C)          hot and cold running water                                                                                                                2;
(7)           appearance of operators and students                                                                                            4;
(8)           linens:(A)          supply of clean drapes, linens and towels stored in clean closed containers            2;
(B)          soiled drapes, linens and towels properly stored in closed containers                        3;
(9)           waste in closed containers and clean area                                                                                      4;
(10)         equipment cleanliness:(A)          disinfectants selected from those approved by the Federal Environmental Protection Agency                                                                                                               6;
(B)          disinfectants used properly                                                                                                                5;
(C)          all implements cleaned, disinfected, and properly stored                                            12;
(D)          furniture, fixtures, and equipment clean and in good repair                                       7;
(11)         working area: 
(A)          workstation clean                                                                                                                                4;
(B)          lavatories clean                                                                                                                    4;
(C)          jars and containers closed, clean and disinfected                                                         2;
(D)          no unnecessary articles in work area                                                                               2;
(12)         antiseptics and first aid supplies on hand                                                                                       1;
(13)         cosmetics:
(A)          clean and sanitary conditions                                                                                           2;
(B)          storage area for supplies clean and in order                                                                   3;
(14)         no animals or birds kept or allowed in the establishment except as provided by Rule .0117 of this Subchapter.
History Note: Authority G.S. 88B-2; 88B-4; 88B-14; Eff. February 1, 1976; Amended Eff. August 1, 1998; June 1, 1994; April 1, 1991; January 1, 1989; Temporary Amendment Eff. January 20, 1999; Amended Eff. December 1, 2008; August 1, 2000. 21 NCAC 14H .0119          NOTICE TO BOARD History Note:        Authority G.S. 88‑23; 88‑29; Eff. March 1, 1993; Amended Eff. March 1, 1994; Repealed Eff. August 1, 1998.
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21 NCAC 14H .0120  whirlpool, FOOTSPA and facial steamer SANITATION
(a)  As used in this Rule whirlpool or footspa means any basin using circulating water.
(b)  After each patron each whirlpool or footspa must be cleaned and disinfected as follows:
(1)           All water must be drained and all debris removed from the basin;
(2)           The basin must be disinfected by filling the basin with water and circulating:
(A)          Two tablespoons of automatic dishwashing powder and ¼ cup of 5.25 percent household bleach to one gallon of water through the unit for 10 minutes; or
(B)          Surfactant or enzymatic soap with an EPA registered disinfectant with bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal activity used according to manufacturer’s instructions through the unit for 10 minutes;
(3)           The basin must be drained and rinsed with clean water; and
(4)           The basin must be wiped dry with a clean towel.
(c)  At the end of the day each whirlpool or footspa must be cleaned and disinfected as follows:
(1)           The screen must be removed and all debris trapped behind the screen removed;
(2)           The screen and the inlet must be washed with surfactant or enzymatic soap or detergent and rinsed with clean water;
(3)           Before replacing the screen one of the following procedures must be performed:
(A)          The screen must be totally immersed in a household bleach solution of ¼ cup of 5.25percent household bleach to one gallon of water for 10 minutes; or
(B)          The screen must be totally immersed in an EPA registered disinfectant with bactericidal, fungicidal and virucidal activity in accordance to the manufacturer's instructions for 10 minutes;  The inlet and area behind the screen must be cleaned with a brush and surfactant soap and water to remove all visible debris and residue; and(5)           The spa system must be flushed with low sudsing surfactant or enzymatic soap and warm water for at least 10 minutes and then rinsed and drained.
(d)  Every week after cleaning and disinfecting pursuant to Paragraphs (a) and (b) of this Rule each whirlpool and footspa must be cleaned and disinfected in the following manner:(1)           The whirlpool or footspa basin must be filled with water and ¼ cup of 5.25 percent  household bleach for each one gallon of water:(2)           The whirlpool or footspa system must be flushed with the bleach and water solution pursuant to Subparagraph (d)(1) of this Rule for 10 minutes and allowed to sit for at least six hours; and(3)           The whirlpool or footspa system must be drained and flushed with water before use by a patron.(e)  A record must be made of the date and time of each cleaning and disinfecting as required by this Rule including the date, time, reason and name of the staff member that performed the cleaning.  This record must be kept and made available for at least 90 days upon request by either a patron or inspector.(f)  The water in a vaporizer machine must be emptied daily and the unit disinfected.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88B-4; 88B-14; Eff. February 1, 2004; Amended Eff. January 1, 2011; December 1, 2008; May 1, 2007; October 1, 2006; November 1, 2005.  21 ncac 14H .0121          PROHIBITED PRACTICES
(a)  Licensees must not use or possess in a shop any of the following products:
(1)           Methyl Methacrylate Liquid Monomer a.k.a. MMA;
(2)           Razor-type callus shavers designed and intended to cut growths of skin such as corns and calluses;
(3)           Permanent makeup, defined as beautifying the face by inserting or implanting facial cosmetic pigment under the surface of the skin or mucosa;
(4)           FDA rated Class III devices;
(5)           Any adulterated chemical exfoliating substances;
(6)           Carbolic acid (phenol) over two percent strength;
(7)           Animals including insects, fish, amphibians, reptiles, birds or mammals to perform any service; or
(8)           Variable speed electrical nail file on the natural nail unless it has been designed for use on the natural nail.
(b)  A licensee must not:
(1)           Use product in any other manner than the product's intended use;
(2)           Diagnose any medical condition or treat any medical condition unless referred by a physician;
(3)           Provide any service unless trained prior to performing the service;
(4)           Perform services on a client if the licensee has reason to believe the client has any of the following:
(A)          a communicable disease;
(B)          a contagious condition;
(C)          an inflamed, infected, broken, raised or swollen skin or nail tissue; or
(D)          an open wound or sore in the area to be worked on that would contraindicate the efficacy of the service;
(5)           Alter or duplicate a license issued by the Board; or
(6)           Advertise or solicit clients in any form of communication in a manner that is false or misleading.
(c)  Class II devices may be used by licensees while under the supervision of a licensed physician.History Note:        Authority G.S. 88B-2; 88B-4; Eff. April 1, 2004; Amended Eff. January 1, 2011; January 1, 2008; May 1, 2007; December 1, 2004.  
CLIENT CONSULTATION:  
  •  Along with proper sanitation techniques, it is very important to have a client consultation, and to make sure that you know as much as you can about your client’s health and wellness.  Although you are not a licensed medical professional – it is still appropriate for you to ask as many questions as possible regarding your client’s health, wellness, and beauty regimen.  This can help with your client’s safety as a whole, and it is also appropriate for your liability as a beauty professional. Remember, sanitation goes “hand-in-hand” with the protection of you, your client, and your salon spa setting. Below is information regarding the body and the skin, and as we know – various disease causing micro-organisms can enter the body through various openings such as the mouth, the eyes, the ears, and through a cut/wound on the skin (which is the largest organ of the body).
  Cells, Tissues, Organs, & The Body Systems Cells and Cell Growth – Cells are “the basic units of all living things” and the human body is made of cells which in turn produce tissues, organs, and various systems in which the body functions. Cells can grow and even reproduce and replace cells during their appropriate life cycle.  However, if the body is not functioning properly, toxins in the body can impair the overall health of cells. Therefore, cells must have “. . . an adequate supply of food, oxygen, and water . . . eliminate waste products [and be] . . . maintained at the proper temperature.”
TISSUES:  Tissues represent groups of cells “of the same kind” that come together and they include:
*Connective Tissues – Bind and support parts of the body such as: ligaments, cartilage, and fat tissues.
*Muscular Tissues – Helps the body movement as they allow the body to move, contract, and expand.
*Nerve Tissues – Nerve tissues are important because they help to coordinate the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor functions of the brain and of the body. They most importantly carry messages to the brain, which in turn signal the body’s movement and overall function.
*Epithelial Tissue – This tissue is located all over the body as it usually represents a covering of various internal and external parts of the body such as: the skin, digestive organs, and various systems including the respiratory system.   Cells of the epithelial tissue are also packed very closely together.
*Liquid Tissue – Transportation is a key word associated with liquid tissue, which involves carrying waste products, and food by the blood and lymph and the lymphatic system.
ORGANS:  *Cells help to create tissues, and tissues help to create organs. The structure of organs, in turn, helps the body in different ways to function. The primary organs of the body include:
*The Brain - The brain directs our sensory, motor, and learning skills and is enclosed in the skull. The brain is also a core of the central nervous system.
*The Heart – The heart is known for circulating the blood in the body, and it receives blood from the veins and pumps blood into the arteries.  The heart is 5 inches long and 3 ½ inches wide.
*The Lungs – The lungs are known as respiratory organs and they ultimately supply oxygen to the blood.
*The Liver – The liver is the largest gland in the body and is known for secreting bile. The liver also aids in digestion as it removes toxic products to aid in the digestive process.
*The Kidneys – The kidneys are known for excretion as they excrete water and waste.
*The Stomach and Intestines – The stomach and intestines aid in the body’s digestion of food.    
  Body Systems  - Cells help to create tissues, tissues help to create organs, and organs help to create what is known as our body systems. In order for the body to function, the body houses ten (10) systems that are crucial for our well being.
These systems include:
  • The Integumentary System – Comprised of the dermis and epidermis skin layers. This system is part of the largest organ of the body, the skin. It also has “sensory receptors” that aid us with the feeling and touching senses. Regarding our body temperature, this system regulates our body temperature – therefore, allowing us to feel hot, cold, warm, etc.
  • The Skeletal System – This system consists of our bones, cartilages, our joints, and helps to support our overall bodies. Not only does this system serve as support to “hold up our bodies,” it also helps to produce blood cells and stores minerals in our bodies.
  • The Muscular System – Without the muscular system, we could not move our bodies. This system covers our skeletons, and along with the joints and cartilage allows us to have movement in our daily lives.
  • The Nervous System – When we think of our sensory motor and psychomotor skills, we oftentimes think of the nervous system. The nervous system controls our responses, feelings, and works in concert with the brain and the spine.  
  • Circulatory System – Blood flow is important for our everyday bodily functions.  The circulatory system is responsible for the supply of the blood. This system circulates blood and lymph, and works with blood, blood vessels, and lyphatics.
  • Endocrine System – This system represents “ . . . the glands and parts of glands that produce endocrine secretions, help to integrate and control bodily metabolic activity, and include especially the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroids, adrenals, islets of Langerhans, ovaries, and testes (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.”
  • Excretory System – This system is responsible for waste elimination from the body via excretion.  Examples of excretion include urine and sweat.
  • Respiratory System – It is important for the body to receive oxygen, and the respiratory system allows the body to do so by respiration. The nose, nasal passages, larynx, and trachea are key components of the respiratory system.
  • The Digestive System – Before food digests, it must ingest (be taken into the body); it then digests, and then performs absorption.  The digestive system performs the aforementioned tasks and also, the cells use digested food in different parts of the body.
  • The Reproductive System – This system allows humans to reproduce via sexual reproduction. 
 The Skin: When considering Sanitation & Safety standards, we must also note that the skin is vulnerable to pathogens, germs, and disease-causing micro-organisms. The barrier of the skin can be broken (via a blood spill, scratch, or and/or during a service), and a barrier in the skin can aid in the body being infected. Below is a description of various layers of the skin: 
  • The skin is comprised of two layers: the epidermis and the dermis. These two layers help to protect the body from germs, toxic elements, and [again], these layers help the body to function.  Connected together, these two skin layers adjoin and connect capillaries and ducts, which produce feelings and sensation through our skin. Therefore, the dermis and epidermis are vital parts of our body.
  • The epidermis is known as the “outermost layer of the skin,” and is also a very thin layer of the skin. [Again] the epidermis has “sensory receptors” that aid us with the feeling and touching senses. Even our body temperature is regulated through the epidermis – therefore, allowing us to feel hot, cold, and warm senses.
  • The epidermis has four layers, including the Stratum Germinativum, Stratum Granulosum, Stratum Lucidum, and the Stratum Corneum (an additional layer, the Stratum Spinosum will be mentioned as well).  The term stratum means a “layer of tissue,” and again, cells help to create tissues, tissues help to create organs, and organs help to create our bodily systems.
  Client Consultation:
  • Additionally, with the understanding of cells, tissues, organs and systems – client consultation is also imperative for the overall safety of your salon spa environment.  Again, Beauty Professionals are not licensed Medical Professionals, however, as many questions that can be asked about your client – such as medical, lifestyle, and environmental factors can aid in the betterment of the safety and sanitation of your salon spa setting. 
  • From a medical perspective, various questions should include (but are not limited to):
 -       Are there any present medical conditions that your client may have – such as diabetes, high blood pressure, seizures, etc.? -       Are there any past medical conditions that your client would like to make you aware of – such as skin cancer, previous surgeries, shingles, etc.?-       Are there any medications that your client is taking – such as skin care medications including accutane or retinol products; heart medication, birth control, and other medications?-       Is your client pregnant?-       Does your client have any allergies?-       Has your client had any previous microdermabrasion procedures? – If so how many sessions?-       What type of skincare products does your client use and what type of regimen do they have (such as daily use of cleansers, moisturizers, and toners; weekly use of masks; bi-weekly use of exfoliants, etc.)?  
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  • From a lifestyle perspective, you may want to ask some of the following questions:
-       Does your client smoke?-       What type of diet does your client have (beverages, foods, and dietary supplements)?-       Does your client exercise?-       Does your client experience fatigue? 
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  • Various environmental questions can include:
-       Does your client’s work environment affect her or his skin? – such as in a manufacturing plant            -       Where there may be dust particles in the air;-       Does your client live where there may be a high density of smog? -       Is your client exposed to second-hand smoke at home or on the job?
  •  
    • It is also important to ask you client if they have any known allergies, and if they have any known adverse effects to various oils, creams, and lotions. Also regarding your Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS), it’s wise to check for contraindications and side effects that may affect your client (such as being allergic to milk-based products, and receiving a lactic acid light chemical peel). It’s always good to know as much as you can regarding the health and betterment for your client.
  • Communicating these goals are key during the client consultation process.
  • Some of the aforementioned questions may affect the salon spa service directly or in-directly; and some of these questions might not affect the salon spa service at all.  However, it is important to know as many factors as you can, that might better your knowledge of your clients, and their overall health and lifestyle. It could also help your client as well – because you will have to make choices upon how to conduct your services. Ultimately, you want the best results possible for your clients, in the most sanitary and safe environment as possible. 
 As mentioned earlier in this course, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have a lot to do with the regulation of the Beauty Industry.  Although State Boards of Cosmetic Art Examiners articulate the State Rules for beauty professionals, OSHA, the FDA, and EPA regulate various Federal rules and regulations as well.  Primarily (but not limited to), OSHA regulates workplace safety hazards, and OSHA is under the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.  
  • The EPA, for instance, regulates our disinfectants used within the salon spa setting.  The FDA approves various machines that beauty professionals can use – such as microdermabrasion machines . The FDA presently classifies the microdermabrasion machine that beauty professionals use “on their own”, without the direction of a physician, doctor, dermatologist or plastic surgeon as a “Class 1” machine in which Brannon (2008) documents as [not having to]: “demonstrate clinical efficacy;” (i.e., this is not a medical procedure).
  • Medical supervision is not mandated for microdermabrasion service to be performed
Therefore, [again] beauty professionals can perform microdermabrasion services, however, it is important to know your respective State requirements and restrictions regarding the microdermabrasion procedure (some states may not allow beauty professionals to conduct microdermabrasion without medical professional supervision).  
  • In conclusion, the Sanitation & Safety In The Salon Spa Setting Continuing Course strived to educate, inform, and reiterate various rules, laws and regulations regarding sanitation.  Additionally, there was discussion regarding pathogens and various levels of sanitation.  Also, various Federal Agencies were mentioned, in which there was a description and example of some of their regulatory roles and responsibilities regarding the Beauty Industry. 
  • These agencies included the: U.S. Occupational Health and Safety Administration (OSHA), the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The body functions and cells, tissues, organs, and systems were also discussed, as client consultation and safety can be affected by clients’ immune systems as well.
 
  • There was also detailed information covered regarding sanitation standards in North Carolina from the N.C. Sub-chapter 14H – Sanitation Rules and Regulations.  Ultimately, this course was designed for all Beauty Professionals  to “educate and inform.”
  • Please strive to maintain sanitation within your salon and spa settings – to aid the sanitation and safety for you, your client, your salon spa setting, and the overall public as well. Thank you for taking this course, and we hope it was beneficial to all you do in the Beauty Industry!  
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END OF COURSE EXAM BELOW  There is no passing grade for this 2-hr. Online course. However, the course curriculum must be read and each question should be answered to receive a course completion certificate. Please answer each question to the best of your ability. Upon completion, you may submit your test. You will then receive your exam results/score and an electronic copy of your course completion certificate via email the same business day. If you submit your exam after 7:00 p.m. (EST), you will receive your results and emailed certificate the next business day. Please make sure you keep a copy of your electronic online course completion certificate – as the N.C. Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners may request proof of your certificate and course completion information.  This end-of-course exam has a total of 20 True/False questions that derive from all course Modules . Please read and choose the best answer that fits the question. You may answer True or False. Thanks again for choosing The Salon Spa Training Institute as your Continuing Education Provider!

END OF COURSE EXAM - Please answer each question below, and submit your contact information as well (contact information must be included for exam submittal). Thank you.

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1. It is important to practice sanitation and safety standards within all Cosmetology, Manicuring, Esthetics, and Natural Hair Braiding services.
  2. Sterilization is the very highest level of decontamination, and it can be performed solely in the Salon Spa setting.
3. Pathogens are disease-causing micro-organisms, that can cause decontamination.
4. OSHA stands for the Occupational Health and Sanitation Agency.
5. The EPA stands for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.
6. A form of post-service sanitation involves spraying and wiping down: pedicure and manicuring chairs, cosmetology/hair styling chairs, and spa tables.
7. MSDS stands for Material Safety Data Sheet(s).
8. Regarding health and the body, Tissues represent groups of cells of the same kind.
9. An example of a Tissue is the Human Connective Tissue.
10. Client consultation is very important before performing a salon spa-related service.
11. Some client consultation questions can derive from questions regarding your client's medical/health, environment, and lifestyle (activities, nutrition, applying sunscreen, etc.).
12. An FDA Class 1 Machine does not need to produce "clinical efficacy."
13. An example of an FDA Class 1 Machine could be a Microdermabrasion Machine.
14. The skin is composed of one (1) layer: the Dermis.
15. You do not need a Material Safety Data Sheet Book in the Salon Spa setting.
16. A blood spill could occur within the Salon Spa setting.
17. Cells create tissues, tissues create organs, and organs create systems.
18. If there is a blood spill, you should "supply the injured party with an antiseptic," and cover the injured area.
19. Regarding sanitation, "waste materials must be kept in covered receptacles."
20. Hot and cold running water must be available in the toilet room of a salon or spa.

END OF EXAM.

You may now submit your exam by clicking the "Submit Exam" button (below left). Upon payment confirmation and receiving your exam, your test results and course completion certificate will be emailed to you within the same business day (if submitting your test information after 7:00 p.m. EST, you should receive your results the next business day). Please make sure you have included your name, license type, State where licensed, license number, email address, and phone number with the submittal of your exam. Thank you for choosing The Salon Spa Training Institute as your Continuing Education Course Provider!