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THE ULTIMATE SPA PEDICURE & "SPA FACTORS"

Course Hours: 4

Eligibility: Cosmetologists (C), Manicurists (M), Teachers (T)/Instructors (I)

This Course is Offered to Licensees in: North Carolina, Nevada, and West Virginia (101/2hrs., 102/2hrs. - 4hrs. Total)

Note: *Please take the allotted time for this 4 hr. course to read, reflect, and retain the information.  After you read through your course for the allotted 4 hrs., you can take and submit your end-of-course exam at the bottom.  Please include your name, license number and contact information at the beginning of your end-of-course exam. At the end of your exam, please press the "Submit Exam" button to submit your exam.  We will then email your exam results and course completion certificate within the same business day. If your exam is submitted after 7:00 p.m., we will email your results the next business day. Thank you and if you have any questions, please feel free to contact us at 919-672-4698, or email at SalonSpaTraining@aol.com (Note: Our online CE courses have  a timer/timing element; but it is presently being rebooted for our system, and will be up soon. Therefore, this is an alternative way you can take your online CE course.  Thank you for your patience, and we hope you enjoy your course!).

*NOTE: AFTER YOU REGISTER/PAY FOR YOUR COURSE, YOU MUST READ THIS COURSE FOR THE 4hr. REQUIREMENT. PLEASE DO NOT SUBMIT YOUR END-OF-COURSE EXAM UNTIL 4hs. AFTER YOUR COURSE PAYMENT. 

CE Provider/Owner/CE Instructor:

Dr. Terri Rowland

Salon Spa Training Institute Contact Information:

Course Instructions:

  • There is no passing grade for this 4-hr. Online course. However, the course curriculum must be read and there are five Modules (I-V) included in the course readings.  You also are required to take the end of course exam, and each question should be answered to receive a course completion certificate. Please answer each question to the best of your ability. Upon completion, you may submit your exam online by pressing the "Submit Exam button."
  • Upon receiving your exam and payment confirmation, you will receive your course completion certificate the same business day. If you submit your exam after 7:00 p.m., you will receive your emailed results and completion certificate the next business day. If you have successfully submitted the "submit" test button, please be assured that we have received your test - but please make sure you include your name, license type, license number, and contact information at the beginning of your exam.
  • This exam has a total of 40 multiple choice questions that derive from all course Modules (I-V). Please read and choose one answer that best fits the question. When you answer the questions, just click the "drop down button" and select your chosen answer by selecting "True" or "False".
  • Again, please make sure you include your name, contact phone number, email address, your License type (C,M,) and License number, and contact information at the beginning of your exam.
  • You have 30 days to complete this Online course.

 

                        (YOU MAY BEGIN (4 hrs./240 Min.)

MODULE I & COURSE INTRODUCTION (15Min. total)

COURSE INTRODUCTION (5 min.) 

Course Objectives:

  • To understand the overall difference between a standard pedicure and a spa pedicure; and the client benefits of a spa pedicure as well.
  • To discuss the aspects of anatomy and physiology, with topics including - cells, tissues, organs, and body systems.
  • To emphasize the importance of sanitation and disinfection, and the proper pre-service set up.
  • To review the step-by-step spa pedicure procedure and to incorporate "spa factors" which include - atmosphere, aromatherapy, time, paraffin, soaks/scrubs/masks, hand manipulation, and heel treatments.
  • To highlight the post service, clean up, and sanitation procedures after the ultimate spa pedicure.
  • To discuss the salon business benefits of a spa pedicure including signature service recognition, repeat clients, and increased financial rewards.

Introduction:

The pedicure is one of the most sought after services in the salon and spa environments today. This service is requested by younger teens, baby boomers, senior adults, the younger generation, women and men, and universally is a service that provides care of the feet, toes, and toenails. There are various types of general pedicures, depending upon the salon environment, the client's preferences (such as polish or no polish), and the pedicure services the cosmetologist or manicurist chooses to perform. Since the boom of the spas and spa-related services in the 1990s, there have been pedicures that have received "upgrades" with a luxury touch. The standard pedicure can be "upgraded" to a spa pedicure, and there are several factors that can give your spa pedicure a special signature to your technique and your salon or spa's identity. Ultimately, this course will entail the followings modules:

The 5 Modules are as follows:

Module I:    Definition of a Spa Pedicure: Standard Pedicure vs. The Spa Pedicure, and the Client Benefits of a Spa Pedicure

Module II:   Anatomy and Physiology

Module III:  Sanitation & Pre-Service Set Up

Module IV: The Spa Pedicure: A Step-by-Step Procedure & "The Spa Factors": Seven (7) factors that can contribute to the "spa pedicure" experience and how to incorporate these factors with your spa pedicure steps. These factors include:

  • o Atmosphere
  • o Aromatherapy
  • o Time
  • o Paraffin
  • o Soaks, Scrubs & Masks
  • o Hand Manipulation/Foot Massage
  • o Special Heel Treatments

Module V:  Post-Service, Sanitation, and Spa Pedicure Benefits for Cosmetologists and Manicurists

Course Completion Requirements:

After reading the five modules, there will be a test that will allow you to review, analyze and ascertain what you have learned in this course.  This test has 40 multiple choice questions, and you do not have to pass this test to complete this correspondence course.  However, you will be asked to complete each answer to the best of your ability.

MODULE I (10 Min. Total)

DEFINITION OF A SPA PEDICURE:

THE STANDARD PEDICURE vs. THE SPA PEDICURE,

AND THE CLIENT BENEFITS OF A SPA PEDICURE

•I.                  Definition of Spa Pedicure: The Standard Pedicure vs. The Spa Pedicure (7 min.)

  • A. The Standard Pedicure
  • 1. A pedicure performed by a licensed Manicurist or Cosmetologist (both to be identified in the course oftentimes as the "pedicurist") involves professional care of the feet, toes, and nails via cutting and shaping the toenails, polishing the toenails, and hand manipulations (i.e., foot massage) applied to the feet.
  • 2. Traditionally, a pedicure is performed with water, and this may be accompanied with a foot bath/basin (small open tub that holds water); or a whirlpool tub, better known as a "foot spa," that may produce vibrations, and whirlpool motions of water flow.
  • 3. The general procedures of a standard pedicure include:
  • a. Pre-service sanitation and set up
  • b. Soaking the feet
  • c. Caring for the toenails (i.e., trimming, filing, cuticle removal)
  • d. Skin service (i.e., sloughing and/or foot filing [with a State approved file or buffer])
  • e. Hand manipulation/foot massage
  • f. And polishing the toenails if the client chooses to have polish.
  • 4. The standard pedicure lasts between 20-30 minutes, and pricing rates may vary depending upon several factors including: expertise of the pedicurist; equipment used (such as the whirlpool foot spa); professional products used; U.S. geographic location of the salon/spa & local cost of living. Therefore, standard pedicure pricing can be estimated between $20.00 - $35.00.

 

  • B. The Spa Pedicure
  • 1. The spa pedicure is a more detailed pedicure experience that may take 45 -60 minutes. The spa pedicure may include "add-on" services and from a beauty education perspective, the spa pedicure is often referred to as the "full service pedicure."
  • 2. Add-on services that make a spa pedicure different from a standard pedicure include the following "spa factors":
  • a) Atmosphere
  • b) Aromatherapy
  • c) Time
  • d) Paraffin
  • e) Soaks, Scrubs, & Masks
  • f) Hand Manipulations for Foot Massage
  • g) Special Heel Treatments.

  • 3. Additionally, the cost of a spa pedicure is traditionally more than a standard pedicure and as mentioned before, the experience of the pedicurist; products used; geographic location & cost of living; and the time it takes to complete the spa pedicure service should be taken into consideration. Additionally, the type of facility may warrant higher prices for the spa pedicure (such as an exclusive spa with privacy for the client). Therefore, the spa pedicure pricing can be estimated between $40.00 - $65.00

•II.               Client Benefits of a Spa Pedicure (3 Min.)

  • A. A spa pedicure can be a very relaxing feeling for your client that boosts self esteem as well.
  • B. A spa pedicure can serve as a personal retreat for clients and can encourage a peaceful and relaxing atmosphere.
  • C. The client will also know that s/he is experiencing an "upper-level" service that's different from the norm. Oftentimes, when clients know that they are receiving something special, it makes them feel special as well.
  • D. The spa pedicure will also add to client benefits including - feeling pampered beyond the basic pedicure service; feeling relaxed; having very well cared for feet that [should be] more moisturized and exfoliated; and better overall grooming of the feet.
  • E. Ultimately, if your client is pleased, s/he will refer other persons to you for your pedicure service. Your spa pedicure client will take pride in informing the public about your signature service, and they too will "take ownership" in being a part of your growing pedicure client list. Ultimately, this will add to your client base and can boost your personal and/or salon business.

 

MODULE II (60 Min.)

ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY

•III.           Anatomy & Physiology (60 Min.)

(A & B  10 min. - Introduction, Cells, and Cell Growth)

  • A. In Milady's Standard Nail Technology (2004), there is a detailed description of anatomy, physiology, and skin disorders applicable to the body, nails, and feet. It is appropriate for the licensed pedicurist to be well aware of the body and various functions of the body. Although licensed cosmetologists and manicurists are not medical doctors, there is a level of professionalism and judgment that has to be made regarding the care of one's feet. If there is something visually seen on the feet and/or toenails that does not appear normal, the pedicurist has to make a decision upon whether or not to perform a service - and to recommend that their client visit a medical professional for further consultation. Ultimately, cells, tissues and organs are components of our bodies, and the following information highlights cells and cell growth and various tissues and organs as well. Therefore, a brief overview of anatomy and physiology may give you some insight upon how our bodies are made, and how they function. The beauty profession is a "touching profession" in which beauty professionals see, touch and feel clients via cosmetology, manicuring, pedicuring, and esthetics-related services. In turn, we get a first hand view of our clients' skin and visible discoveries may be helpful to your overall client's health.

  • B. Cells and Cell Growth - Cells are "the basic units of all living things" and the human body is made of cells which in turn produce tissues, organs, and various systems in which the body functions. Cells can grow and even reproduce and replace cells during their appropriate life cycle. However, if the body is not functioning properly, toxins in the body can impair the overall health of cells. Therefore, cells must have ". . . an adequate supply of food, oxygen, and water . . . eliminate waste products [and be] . . . maintained at the proper temperature."

Diagram of a Cell
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Cited From www.cartage.org.lb

 
  • C. Tissues (10 Min.)- Represent groups of cells "of the same kind" that come together and they include:

                                                          Human Connective Tissues

Human Connective Tissues
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Cited From ScienceHelpDesk.com

  • 1. Connective Tissues - Bind and support parts of the body such as: ligaments, cartilage, and fat tissues.

  • 2. Muscular Tissues - Helps the body movement as they allow the body to move, contract, and expand.

  • 3. Nerve Tissues - Nerve tissues are important because they help to coordinate the cognitive, affective, and psychomotor functions of the brain and of the body. They most importantly carry messages to the brain, which in turn signal the body's movement and overall function.

  • 4. Epithelial Tissue - This tissue is located all over the body as it usually represents a covering of various internal and external parts of the body such as: the skin, digestive organs, and various systems including the respiratory system. Cells of the epithelial tissue are also packed very closely together.

  • 5. Liquid Tissue - Transportation is a key word associated with liquid tissue, which involves carrying was products, and food by the blood and lymph and the lymphatic system.

Role of Tissues
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Cited From EoEarth.org (Encyclopedia of Earth)

 

 

  • D. Organs (10 Min.) - Cells help to create tissues, and tissues help to create organs. The structure of organs, in turn, helps the body in different ways to function. The primary organs of the body include:
  • 1. The Brain - The brain directs our sensory, motor, and learning skills and is enclosed in the skull. The brain is also a core of the central nervous system.

  • 2. The Heart - The heart is known for circulating the blood in the body, and it receives blood from the veins and pumps blood into the arteries. The heart is 5 inches long and 3 ½ inches wide.

  • 3. The Lungs - The lungs are known as respiratory organs and they ultimately supply oxygen to the blood.

  • 4. The Liver - The liver is the largest glad in the body and is known for secreting bile. The liver also aids in digestion as it removes toxic products to aid in the digestive process.

  • 5. The Kidneys - The kidneys are known for excretion as they excrete water and waste.

  • 6. The Stomach and Intestines - The stomach and intestines aid in the body's digestion of food.

Body Organs
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Cited FromUniverseReview.ca

  • E. Body Systems (10 Min.)- Cells help to create tissues, tissues help to create organs, and organs help to create what is known as our body systems. In order for the body to function, the body houses ten (10) systems that are crucial for our well being. These systems include:
  • 1. The Integumentary System - Comprised of the dermis and epidermis skin layers. This system is part of the largest organ of the body, the skin. It also has "sensory receptors" that aid us with the feeling and touching senses. Regarding our body temperature, this system regulates our body temperature - therefore, allowing us to feel hot, cold, warm, etc.

  • 2. The Skeletal System - This system consists of our bones, cartilages, our joints, and helps to support our overall bodies. Not only does this system serve as support to "hold up our bodies," it also helps to produce blood cells and stores minerals in our bodies.

  • 3. The Muscular System - Without the muscular system, we could not move our bodies. This system covers our skeletons, and along with the joints and cartilage allows us to have movement in our daily lives.

  • 4. The Nervous System - When we think of our sensory motor and psychomotor skills, we oftentimes think of the nervous system. The nervous system controls our responses, feelings, and works in concert with the brain and the spine.

  • 5. Circulatory System - Blood flow is important for our everyday bodily functions. The circulatory system is responsible for the supply of the blood. This system circulates blood and lymph, and works with blood, blood vessels, and lyphatics.

  • 6. Endocrine System - This system represents " . . . the glands and parts of glands that produce endocrine secretions, help to integrate and control bodily metabolic activity, and include especially the pituitary, thyroid, parathyroids, adrenals, islets of Langerhans, ovaries, and testes (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services."

  • 7. Excretory System - This system is responsible for waste elimination from the body via excretion. Examples of excretion include urine and sweat.

  • 8. Respiratory System - It is important for the body to receive oxygen, and the respiratory system allow the body to do so by respiration. The nose, nasal passages, larynx, and trachea are key components of the respiratory system.

  • 9. The Digestive System - Before food digests, it must ingest (be taken into the body); it then digests, and then performs absorption. The digestive system performs the aforementioned tasks and also, the cells use digested food in different parts of the body.

  • 10. The Reproductive System - This system allows humans to reproduce via sexual reproduction.

 

  • F. The Skeletal System (10 Min.): A more in-depth perspective:
  • a. This system is the framework of our bodies. It helps us to walk, move, holds our bodily organs, and is the foundation of our bodies from a physical perspective.
  • b. There are 206 bones that comprise our skeletal system.
  • c. Minerals are stored in this system including calcium, which aids in the overall health of the body.
  • d. Regarding our bone structure, osteocytes are bone cells that are connective tissues that are very hard.
  • e. Periosteum represents connective tissues that cover the bones, and these tissues have cells that help to repair the body.
  • f. Haversian canals are canals within the bone structure that aid in nutrition being received from arteries in the periosteum.
  • g. Marrow in the bones are essential for our bodies because it produces blood cells.
  • h. Cartilage is a substance that is a very tough flexible tissue. It is located at the end of joints and helps shape different parts of our bodies, such as your ears and nose. It also helps support your bones via providing a cushion and aiding the bones to not rub together.
  • i. A joint is where two or more bones meet together, and they are joined by ligaments. An example would be where the knee meets or the hip meets.
  • j. Ligaments [again] support bones and cartilages and they support organs as well.
  • k. The Spa Pedicure and Bones: Bones of the Leg and Foot
  • 1) Concerning the leg, the primary bones include the femur, the tibia, the fibula, and the patella. The femur is a long bone that connects the hip and the knee. The tibia is and fibula are located between the knee and the ankle and the tibia is the larger bone and the fibula is the smaller bone. The patella represents the knee cap and is located between the femur, tibia and fibula.

Bones of the Foot
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Cited From Southwest-ortho.com

 
  • 2) Concerning the ankles and feet: the talus, tarsal bones, metatarsal bones, and the phalanges collectively represent our ankle bone and bones of the feet. There are 26 bones in the foot and, three joints actually comprise our ankle, including the tibia and fibula, and the sole "ankle bone" known as the talus. The talus then joins the tarsal and metatarsal bones in which the seven (7) tarsal bones: are directly connected to the talus, and they include the: talus, calcaneous, navicular, three cuneiform bones, and the cuboid. The tarsal bones are then connected to the metatarsal bones; and the metatarsal bones are collected to the phalanges - which represent toes. There are also 14 bones in the phalanges portion of our feet.

  • G. Hand Manipulation, Massage, and Muscles in the Foot (10 Min.) - muscles in our feet and legs help to support everyday movements. Muscles cover our bones and they also shape the skeleton of the body as well. As a pedicurist, you need to be aware of the muscles in the feet and you should have a general understanding of the muscular system. Although the Pedicurist license is not the same as a Massage Therapist's license, there are still "hand manipulations" that can be implemented during the pedicuring procedure. Various types of hand manipulations will be further explored in the "Spa Factors" section of this course.

 The entire muscular system represents over 500 muscles, and the three types of muscular tissue includes:

  • a) striated muscles (voluntary movement, such as in the arms and legs);
  • b) non-striated muscles (involuntary movement, such as the stomach); and the
  • c) cardiac muscle (which is the heart muscle).
  • d) The foot also contains the primary muscles including the extensor digitorum brevis; the flexor digitorum brevis; and the abductor hallucis, and the abductor. Overall, these muscles aid in foot movement, toe movement, and they also assist with balance and our psychomotor skills.

Muscles of the Feet
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Cited from Comcast.net

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MODULE III (60 Min.)

SANITATION AND PRE-SERVICE SET UP

IV:       Sanitation and Pre-Service Set Up (60 Min.)

(Sanitation, Contamination, Pathogens, Decontamination MSDS 20 Min.)

  • A. Sanitation is very important in a salon setting. State Boards and regulatory agencies are very stringent on making certain that professionals in the beauty industry use precaution in regard to cleanliness and sanitary salon and spa environments. It is an overall goal of making sure that there is control of contamination upon all levels in the salon setting.
  • B. Contamination- Ultimately, if something is soiled, tainted, or infected - it can be considered contaminated. Therefore, decontamination is imperative for a safe, healthy salon and concerning pedicures - it is important to make certain that foot baths and whirlpool tubs are decontaminated.
  • C. Pathogens - are disease-causing microorganisms that cause contamination. In order to control pathogens, surfaces (living or non-living) and implements must be decontaminated.
  • D. Three types of decontamination - There are three (3) types of decontamination which include sterilization, disinfection, and sanitation.
  • 1. Sterilization - This is the very highest level of decontamination, and it is mostly associated with hospital-grade decontamination. The sterilization process destroys all living organisms related to a surface or an object. However, the chemicals, products, and processes utilized in sterilization are not appropriate for salon settings. They are not appropriate because there are dangers involved and the chemicals could damage skin, the toenail plate, could cause harm to your eyes, and the like. Therefore, sterilization is [again] not appropriate for the salon and spa settings.
  • 2. Disinfection -
  • a. This process is the second highest level of decontamination, because it controls microorganisms that grow on various implements used in the salon setting such as: metal cuticle pushers and toenail clippers. These items are known as "non-living surfaces" and for a pedicure, they are utilized quite regularly. The chemical products used in disinfection often have strong chemical properties and need to be used safely. Therefore, you must follow safety rules documented by the manufacturer of the disinfectant product (further discussion regarding the manufacturer's Material Safety Data Sheet will follow [MSDS]).
  • b. In the salon setting, the disinfection: of bacteria, viruses, and fungus are crucial. Therefore, EPA registered, hospital-level disinfection is used to disinfect by killing bactericides, viricides, and fungicides. The EPA stands for the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and their primary mission is to: ". . . protect human health and the environment . . ." and to ". . . lead the nation's environmental science, research, education and assessment efforts." Concerning the spa pedicure, particularly in footbaths and whirlpool tubs, disinfection is key for the overall health and safety of the ultimate spa pedicure client, the pedicurist, the salon equipment and tools, and the salon overall.
  • 3. Sanitation - This is the lowest level of decontamination in the salon setting, however, it is still very important. Sanitation can help to reduce pathogens on living and non-living surfaces such as your hands (living) and your salon floor (non-living). If you are using an antiseptic on your hands, that is an example of sanitation. If you are washing your towels and linens, that is a form of sanitation (as long as the water temperature is appropriate according to State Board regulatory standards). If you are sweeping the floor, that is a form of sanitation. Therefore, sanitation is important as well and can oftentimes be associated with the daily cleaning routine of a salon.

  • E. The Importance of Material Safety Data Sheets, Blood Spills, and Foot Spa Sanitation
  • 1. Material Safety Data Sheets (MSDS)
  • a. Material Safety Data Sheets are required by the U.S. Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), and the following information should be included, which highlights the product, the contents, or the product, and how the product should be handled in the workplace setting (direct exert from OSHA):
  • § Identification
  • § Hazard(s) identification
  • § Composition/information on ingredients
  • § First-aid measures
  • § Fire-fighting measures
  • § Accidental release measures
  • § Handling and storage
  • § Exposure controls/personal protection
  • § Physical and chemical properties
  • § Stability and reactivity
  • § Toxicological information
  • § Ecological information
  • § Disposal considerations
  • § Transport information
  • § Regulatory information
  • § Other information

  • b. Salons and Spas should also create a MSDS book, which includes a listing of all disinfectants and salon-based products that require an MSDS. This book will serve as a central resource, in which all employees and/or independent contractors can have access. It is also appropriate for all persons working at a salon or spa to review and discuss the MSDS book as well. This can help with preventative measures regarding accidents that can happen with various chemical products.

(Blood Spills Procedure and Foot Spa Sanitation 20 Min.)

  • 2. Blood Spills - There may be an instance where a blood spill may occur within the salon setting. With spa pedicures, the spill may occur from a filing technique on the toe nails, or from a cuticle procedure that might cut the cuticle. According the National Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology, there is an "NIC Health and Safety Standards Blood Spill Procedure", and below is a copy of their official handout which is available at www.nictesting.org/testing.htm (revised 01/07):

NIC HEALTH AND SAFETY STANDARDS BLOOD SPILL PROCEDURE

If a blood spill should occur, the following steps MUST be followed:

  • SUPPLY INJURED PARTY WITH LIQUID STYPTIC/ANTISEPTIC AND THE APPROPRIATE DRESSING TO COVER THE INJURY.
  • DOUBLE BAG ALL BLOOD-SOILED (CONTAMINATED) ARTICLES AND LABEL WITH RED OR ORANGE BIOHAZARD WARNING.  This is the responsibility of the candidate and should be executed as follows:

PEDICURIST'S INJURY -

•1.      PROTECTION - If a cut is sustained, stop the service and clean the injured area.

•2.      APPLY antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic as appropriate (see NOTE).

•3.      DRESSING - cover the injury with the appropriate dressing.

•4.      COVER injured area with finger guard or glove as appropriate.

•5.      CLEAN model/client and station as appropriate.

•6.      DOUBLE BAG and dispose of all contaminated objects.  Clean hands with antimicrobial cleanser.

•7.      RETURN to service.

CLIENT INJURY -

•1.      STOP service.

•2.      GLOVE hands of candidate/student/licensee.

•3.      CLEAN injured area as appropriate.

•4.      APPLY antiseptic and/or liquid or spray styptic as appropriate (see NOTE).

•5.      COVER the injury with the appropriate dressing to prevent further blood exposure.

•6.      DOUBLE BAG and dispose of all contaminated objects.  Clean hands with antimicrobial cleanser.

•7.      RETURN to service.

EXAMINATIONS:

  • EXAMINER IS TO USE UNUSED DISPOSABLE LATEX GLOVES OR NON-ALLERGENIC EQUIVALENT WHEN CHECKING THAT CANDIDATE'S SERVICE. DOUBLE BAG AND DISPOSE USED GLOVES.
  • FOLLOW WITH ANTIMICROBIAL SCRUB ON HANDS.
  • DOCUMENT INCIDENT IN BLOOD SPILL LOG.

NOTE:            DO NOT ALLOW CONTAINERS, BRUSHES, NOZZLES OR LIQUID STYPTIC TO TOUCH THE SKIN OR CONTACT THE WOUND.  USE AN APPLICATOR.  EXAMINERS SHOULD ALSO COMPLETE AN INCIDENT REPORT.

WET DISINFECTION STANDARD

           

1 All tools and implements, EXCEPT THOSE THAT HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS must be disinfected, at minimum, by complete immersion in an EPA registered, bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, and   pseudomonacidal (Formulated for Hospitals) disinfectant that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer's directions.

2 All tools and implements WHICH HAVE COME IN CONTACT WITH BLOOD OR BODY FLUIDS must be disinfected, at  minimum, by complete immersion in an

EPA registered disinfectant that is effective against HIV-1 and human Hepatitis B Virus

or Tuberculocidal that is mixed and used according to the manufacturer's directions.

DRY STORAGE STANDARD

Disinfected implements must be stored in a disinfected, dry, covered container and be isolated from contaminants.

HAND WASHING

(Anti-Bacterial Soap is recommended)

Thoroughly wash hands and the exposed portions of arms with antibacterial soap and water before providing services to each client and after smoking, drinking, eating, and using the restroom.

  • 3. FootSpa Sanitation - Footspas are used widely in the pedicuring process; however, there are rules and regulations that must follow to maintain proper disinfection and safety. This Online Course is for licensees in Ohio-  and below, is a sample footspa sanitation procedure, according to the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners. Please follow the Ohio State Board sanitation rules.  The information below is for reference purposes only.

21 NCAC 14H .0120          FOOTSPA SANITATION

Manicurists and Cosmetologists shall use the following disinfection procedures to ensure proper cleaning and maintenance of any foot spa equipment and to prevent bacterial infection:

  • Between each customer a manicurist or cosmetologist shall:
  • (1) drain all water and remove all debris from the foot spa;
  • (2) clean and scrub the surfaces and walls of the foot spas with a scrub-brush and soap or detergent and rinse with clean, clear water; and
  • (3) disinfect with an EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) and tuberculocidal disinfectant, used according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • At the end of the day a manicurist or cosmetologist shall:
  • (1) remove the screen. All debris trapped behind the screen of each foot spa shall be removed, and the screen and the inlet shall be washed with soap or detergent and water;
  • (2) before replacing the screen wash the screen with a chlorine bleach solution of one part bleach to 10 parts water, or totally immerse the screen in an EPA registered disinfectant;
  • (3) fill the foot spa tub with five gallons of water and four cups of five per cent bleach solution; or
  • (4) disinfect with an EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) and tuberculocidal disinfectant, used according to the manufacturer's instructions;
  • (5) circulate the solution through the foot spa system for no less than 10 minutes;
  • (6) let the solution sit overnight (at least six hours);
  • (7) drain and flush the system the following morning; and
  • (8) make a record of the date/time of this cleaning and disinfecting, on a form provided by the Board. The record for the last 90 days shall be accessible upon client or Board inspector request.

•F.     Spa Pedicure Equipment, Supplies, and Set Up Needed (20 Min.):

According to Mix (2004), the pedicure set up is similar to the manicure set up, whereas you need proper nail technology tools and implements.  Ultimately, you will need (1) pedicure supplies, (2) equipment & tools, (3) implements, (4) materials, and (5) cosmetics.

Pedicure Supplies:

Pedicure supplies include:

  • Pedicuring Station - the station includes furniture items that will make the client and the pedicurist comfortable during the spa pedicure process. The station will have to include:
  • A chair and footrest for the client, in which (1) the chair should have proper armrests, and (2) the footrest should allow the client to prop her/his feet during the spa pedicure. The footrest should also be covered with a clean towel, for sanitary purposes. This towel will allow protection between the clients' feet and the surface of the footrest during the spa pedicure. Some pedicuring stations are "all in one" where the chair, pedicuring footbath, and the foot rest are built in together.
  • A chair or low stool for the pedicurist is also required. There are manufactures of pedicure furniture that can include the low stool/chair and footrest within the same unit.
  • Foot Spa - A foot bath/basin, whirlpool tub, or foot spa is needed to provide the spa pedicure service. For the remainder of this course, the items that will hold water during the spa pedicure service will now be referred to as a "foot spa." The foot spa has to be used with warm water and a liquid soap solution for the client's foot soak. Additionally, the foot spa must have enough depth to cover the client's feet with water.
  • Foot file for removing dry skin - Depending upon the State Board of Cosmetology, you have to use the board-approved foot file for removing callus growth on the feet. This foot file may be an abrasive sanding file that is similar to a nail file with a grit surface, or it may be a metal file that can be disinfected after pedicure uses. Please follow your State Cosmetology Board rule for the use of callus shavers (many States do not allow the use of callus shavers).
  • Toenail clippers - Make certain that your toenail clippers are disinfected between each pedicure use. It is also good to have two or more toenails clippers, along with other metal implements that can be sanitized and disinfected ahead of time. This will help with you with not only sanitation, but will prove valuable for your time as you can have disinfected implements readily available for your next spa pedicure.
  • Anticeptic foot spray - This is appropriate for sanitation and the client and pedicurist's safety. This spray should be a commercial product manufactured that documents that it is "antifungal" and is also a mild antiseptic.
  • Liquid Soap - As mentioned previously, the foot spa has to be used with warm water and a liquid soap solution for the client's foot soak. There should also be some type of antifungal solution in the liquid soap/foot soak, which will serve a purpose of reducing bacteria (antibacterial). There are also professional line foot soaks, that aid in loosening up the callus build up on the feet as well. (Liquid Soap is also mentioned in the "cosmetics" section below.)
  • Foot creams for hand manipulation & foot massage and powders for keeping feet dry after the spa pedicure service are also recommended. However, added products for the ultimate spa pedicure will be explained further in "The Spa Factors" section of this course. (Foot creams and powders are also mentioned in the "cosmetics" section below.)
  • Lastly, pedicure slippers are recommended, especially if the spa pedicure client would like to let polish dry. If your client does not have open toe shoes, these slippers are ideal and they give your client a feeling that you are being considerate of their needs - and that you provide a "classy pedicure experience" from the beginning to the end.

The following items below are required for the pedicure set up, and the "spa factor" add-on service equipment, implements, and materials will be discussed further in the course.

Equipment/Tools

Manicure Table with Adjustable Lamp (will be used to accompany the ultimate spa pedicure)

Disinfection Container

Client's Foot Cushion

*Paraffin Warmer

Sanitized Work Container

Supply Tray

Electric Pedicure Nail Dryer

*Denotes spa factor/spa add-on item

Implements (must be discarded after use or properly sanitized after use):

Orangewood Stick

Toenail clipper (repeated for instructional purposes)

Steel Pusher

Metal Nail File (if applicable)

Nail Brush

Emery Board

Cuticle Nipper

Materials (usable one [1] time only):

Disposable towels or cloth towels

Cotton Balls/Cotton Pads

Plastic Spatulas

Plastic Bags

*Paraffin Wax

Trash Containers

Safety Kit

*Denotes spa factor/spa add-on item

  • G. Cosmetics & Additional Supplies Used for the Spa Pedicure

In order to beautify the toenails and moisturize the feet, various "nail cosmetics" will be needed.  It is also important to note that your clients may have allergies, and you definitely want to make sure that you know the contents, how to use, and apply the nail cosmetics. These items include:

*Foot Soak

Polish Remover

Cuticle Cream

Cuticle Oil

Cuticle Solvent and/or Cuticle Remover

Nail Bleach

Nail Whitener

Nail Polish

Base Coat

Top Coat/Sealer

Nail Hardener

Nail Dry (liquid and/or aerosol)

Foot Cream and/or Lotion

*Aromatherapy Essential Oils

*Heel Treatment

*Foot Massage Oil

*Foot Scrubs

*Foot Mask

*Denotes spa factor/spa add-on item

  • H. Pedicure Table Set Up
  1. The table must be cleaned with a State Board-approved sanitizer. This table can be a formal manicure table, or it can be the top [table of a pedicure cart as well.
  2. Wrap clients pedicure cushion with a clean towel, or place clean towel on top of cushion.
  3. Disinfection container - After washing and drying your metal implements, you must soak them in an approved State Board disinfectant at least 20 minutes before your first pedicure. 
  4. All cosmetics (excluding polish) should be placed behind the disinfection container.
  5. Emery boards should be place on the right side of the table (if left-handed, on the left).
  6. Nail brush.
  7. Plastic disposable/trash bag - attached to the side of the table on the right side if right-handed and the left side if left-handed.
  8. Note: *The nail drawer can be used for storage of nail cosmetics, materials, implements, and equipment. However, there can be no un-sanitized or non-disinfected materials in the drawer.
  9. Note: If the pedicurist has a custom pedicure caddy or cart, s/he can use the cart to house the same tools, supplies, and implements. The cart set up should include the same sanitation rules as a manicuring table.

MODULE IV (90 Min.)

THE ULTIMATE SPA PEDICURE & THE SPA FACTORS

A STEP-BY-STEP PROCEDURE

  1. The Spa Factors Introduction (15 Min.) - The following spa factors can be incorporated into the spa pedicure, which are also known as "add-on services." Within Module IV, the spa factors and how they are applied during the spa pedicure service (step-by-step procedures) will be explained concurrently. [Again], the seven "spa factors" include:
  • Atmosphere
  • Aromatherapy
  • Time
  • Paraffin
  • Soaks, Scrubs & Masks
  • Hand Manipulation/Foot Massage
  • Special Heel Treatments

  • 1. Atmosphere, Time, and Introduction to Aromatherapy

In a salon or spa setting, it is important to offer clients a quality atmosphere along with a quality service. There are some inexpensive strategies you can use to upgrade your client's pedicure experience into a high quality spa pedicure. From a spa pedicure perspective, some quality aspects of atmosphere can include -

  1.  
    1. Pedicure Area Privacy - If you have multiple pedicure chairs, you can install a privacy curtain to serve as a divider between your pedicure chairs.  This will give your clients the illusion of having a separate area where they are being serviced. If you have a separate pedicure room, this will also give a private atmosphere for the spa pedicure as well.
    2. Relaxing Music - Soft (volume), classical music is played oftentimes for the spa pedicure experience, but you can also try jazz music as well to liven up the atmosphere. Music can definitely add a "special touch" to the spa pedicure experience.
    3. Beverage - An offering of bottled water; a glass of water with slices of lemon, lime, or even cucumber; or a cool beverage (juice, soda, sparkling cider) before the service escalates the "service aspect" of the spa pedicure.
    4. Reading Materials - Offering a magazine to read provides an additional, complementary service for your client. This will allow them to stay occupied, and to read and enjoy.  Also, if the pedicure client chooses to relax during the service and not read a book or magazine; a quiet environment is relaxing as well.  Therefore, if there's not a lot of talking in the service area, the client will have more time to relax.
  • 2. Time - As mentioned previously, the standard pedicure lasts between 20-30 minutes, and pricing rates may vary depending upon several factors including: expertise of the pedicurist; equipment used (such as the whirlpool foot spa); professional products used; U.S. geographic location of the salon/spa & local cost of living. Therefore, standard pedicure pricing can be estimated between $20.00 - $35.00. However, the spa pedicure experience can last between 45 - 60 minutes, and can be priced between $45.00 - $70.00, and [again], the pricing ranges may differ due to the time it takes to complete the service, the products used, equipment used, and the expertise of the pedicurist. Although the price of your services individually (if you are an independent contractor); as an employee; or within your own salon or spa are priced at what you establish - it is always good to research other establishments to compare: what steps they include in their spa pedicure service, the products used, the time it takes to complete the service, and the pricing as well. This just gives an overall view of what other establishments are doing, and it helps to keep you current and up to date.
  • 3. Aromatherapy -
  • a. The term "aromatherapy" can be interpreted as "therapy received from aromas." The various aromas derive from essential oils that are distilled from plant life including [but not limited to]: leaves, stems, flowers, bark, wood, and roots. The distillation occurs through steam or generation from water.
  • b. Aromatherapy is known for improving the mental, health and physical well-being by using the essential oils on the skin, in a water bath, in paraffin wax, or for the sense of smell.
  • c. Essential oils represent plant extracts in their most natural form, and should not be mistaken solely for perfume oils. Some perfume oils derive from, or are created in combination with plant life, but other perfume oils are made from artificial fragrance additives. According to Cunningham (2004), some of the most popular essentials oils include:
  • 1) Lavender - good for first aid, and has a relaxing aroma;
  • 2) Chamomile - good anti-depressant, and has a fruity fragrance;
  • 3) Marjoram - herbaceous (having herbal characteristics), helps with headaches and menstrual cramps;
  • 4) Rosemary - a wood-based oil deriving from the Camphor tree, helps circulation, and is a decongestant;
  • 5) Tea Tree - well known as an antiseptic and also is camphoraceous
  • 6) Cypress - stimulating antiseptic, and derives from evergreen trees such as pine;
  • 7) Peppermint - promotes energy, aids sinus congestion, and has a mint-like smell;
  • 8) Eucalyptus - Camphoraceous essential oil that serves as a stimulant and is antibacterial;
  • 9) Bergamot - Antibacterial and antiviral, with a citrus aroma;
  • 10) Geranium - Has a floral aroma that helps to relax and promotes a tranquil atmosphere.

  • d. Essential oils are known to be very strong and potent, therefore, they are oftentimes diluted with oils called "carrier oils." Some of the most popular carrier oils include:
  • 1) sweet almond oil (often used in massages);
  • 2) apricot oil (good for dry skin, often used in massages as well);
  • 3) avocado oil (full of nutrition and great for dehydrated skin);
  • 4) grapeseed oil (a very light weight massage oil that is used frequently); and
  • 5) jojoba oil (similar to human skin content in regard to our skin's natural oil and sebum).

Within the scope of this course, there will not be as much emphasis on the definition of  aromatherapy, essential oils, carrier oils, and their proprieties.  However, emphasis will be placed on how to use aromatherapy in the context of the ultimate spa pedicure, and how it can be incorporated with the spa factors of - soaks, scrubs and masks; hand manipulation/foot massage; paraffin dips; and heel treatments. Therefore, aromatherapy will be mentioned throughout the ultimate spa pedicure steps. If you would like further knowledge regarding aromatherapy, it is suggested that you take a specialized continuing education course concentrating on aromatherapy.

  • VI. The Ultimate Spa Pedicure & The Spa Factors: A Step-by-Step Procedure (75 Min. Total)

  • A. The Pre-Service (3 min.)
  • 1. Table Sanitized (manicure table or pedicure cart table) with a State Board approved sanitizer (an EPA registered disinfectant can also be used, to ensure even better reduction of pathogens). Your pedicure foot spa, client's chair, and foot rest should also be sanitized.
  • 2. Equipment, tools and implements should be sanitized and [again], an EPA registered disinfectant can be used or a salon-grade solution that is virucidal, fungicidal, and bactericidal.
  • 3. The Pedicurist's hands should be washed with antibacterial soap and sanitized.
  • 4. Greet your client with a smile and professionalism. Whether performing a standard pedicure or the ultimate spa pedicure, you should always be courteous to your clients and you should make them feel welcome at your salon, spa, and or pedicuring station.
  • 5. You should ask your client to remove his/her jewelry (if they are wearing a toe ring or have an ankle bracelet) and it should be placed in a safe place. If you are holding jewelry for your client, ensure your client that it will be well cared for during their service.
  • 6. Your client should wash his/her hands with antibacterial soap and should sanitize their hands as well with a hand sanitizer. Make sure you guide your client with this process and use the hand sanitizer as well for your own hands. This promotes the overall health and sanitation of the salon or spa, and it allows your client to have more confidence in your sanitation procedures.
  • B. Client consultation (2 Min.)
  • 1. This is a very important portion of the spa pedicure pre-service. A health record form should be used for the consultation where you ask about any health-related issues including [but not limited to] - diabetes, skin conditions, medications, pregnancy, recent surgeries, smoking history, and the like. It is also good to have additional information on the form such as - contact information (name, address, email, phone numbers), goals your client would like to see for her or his feet, and products you have used during the spa pedicure process as well).
  • 2. You should also examine your client's feet to check for skin and nail disorders. Make sure your client understands that you are very interested in her or his medical needs and make sure you are attentive and [again] document your consultation.
  • 3. During your initial/first spa pedicure, your client consultation may be longer overall, because it will be your first service. However, when your client books additional spa pedicures, it is still your responsibility to make sure you talk with your client to discuss any health-related concerns and/or overall issues about her or his feet. This can be done at the beginning of your service and can serve as an "ice breaker" of conversation.

 

  • C. The Ultimate Spa Pedicure Service (70 Min.) - One important note is that there are several product manufacturers who have spa pedicure systems available for most spa pedicure steps. These systems may already include soaks, scrubs, masks, lotions, heel creams, cuticle oils, and other products for your spa pedicure service. It is up to you to read, research, and attend product manufacturer workshops and seminars regarding their pedicure system. There is never too much additional education, training, and exposure in the beauty industry.
  • 1. After your client has been seated in the spa pedicure chair, they by now should have had their client consultation; been offered a beverage and a magazine; and it is your choice to have pleasant, relaxing music playing as well. You can also offer your client hand sanitizer and you should have sanitized your hands as well.
  • 2. The next step is to remove your client's shoes and socks. It promotes a "full service" when you remove their shoes and socks for your client, however, make sure you sanitize your hands again after the removal. Your client may also choose to remove her or his socks themselves. Provide a large plastic, disposable bag (similar to a freezer bag) or a tasteful, disposable bag to place their shoes and socks in. OR if your facility has a dressing room with lockers, clients can leave shoes and socks in the dressing room locker. Just make sure that disposable slippers are available if they have to walk out of the dressing room to your pedicure area. Also, if they have on long pants, gently roll the pants up to the knees, so you can have plenty of leg space to perform your spa pedicure service.
  • 3. The client can then rest her or his feet on the towel that is placed on top of your pedicure foot cushion (the pedicure set up and cushion is mentioned earlier in this course).
  • 4. The feet then need to be sprayed with an antiseptic or foot spray. This promotes the reduction of pathogens and protects the client and the foot spa itself with better sanitation.
  • 5. The Foot Soak - The next step is the FOOT SOAK. This process can be a very luxurious process for the client. You can take your hands and guide your client's feet into the foot spa, and make sure you ask your client if they feel comfortable regarding the water temperature. When you fill your foot spa, the water should not be over 104 degrees, and make sure your client consultation considers the water temperature as well. For instance, if your client has circulation issues, you should consider lowering the water temperature. Diabetics are also known not to have very hot water either. Use your preferred spa pedicure foot soak and allow the client to soak for at least 5 minutes. This soak may be accompanied by a whirlpool foot spa if applicable.
  • a. The purpose of the foot soak is to soften the skin and the soaking solution may come in a power or liquid form. The solution should have antiseptic qualities, and should assist in hydration which will help to exfoliate the skin. Sea salt if oftentimes used in pedicure soaking solutions, which have minerals with sodium and magnesium contents. The salt base helps to hydrate the skin.
  • b. The foot soak can also be enhanced by AROMATHERAPY, which can occur in two ways:
  • c. The foot soak product may already have essential oils such as sandalwood or tea tree oil, incorporated in the solution. This process produces a beautiful aroma, especially if a whirlpool foot spa is being used.
  • d. Also, you can pour a few drops of essential oil in the foot spa bath, and the aroma will uplift your client's senses as well. According to Aromaweb.com, some recommended essential oils that help to combat stress include: Benzoin, Bergamot, Clary Sage, Frankincense, Geranium, Grapefruit, Jasmine, Lavender, Mandarin, Neroli, Patchouli, Roman Chamomile, Rose, Sandlewood, Vetiver, and Ylang Ylang.
  • e. CAUTION, MAKE SURE YOU ASK YOUR CLIENT WHETHER OR NOT SHE IS PREGNANT. ESSENTIAL OILS ARE VERY POTENT AND CAN PERMEATE THE SKIN, WHICH IS THE LARGEST ORGAN OF THE BODY. THIS MIGHT NOT BE SAFE FOR THE FETUS.
  • 6. Dry Feet & Prepare for Polish Removal - Use your hands to guide both your client's feet out of the foot spa and place the feet on the towel-coverd foot cushion. Then dry the client's feet and prepare for polish removal.
  • 7. Remove Toenail Polish (if applicable) - If your client has on toenail polish or clear polish, you need to remove the polish. Use rolled cotton or a cotton ball soaked with a State Board-approved polish remover to remove polish. Start out with the left foot and remove polish from the small toe to the big toe. Use cotton in a circular motion to remove polish and make sure you discard the cotton in the disposable bag located at your manicuring table or pedicuring station. Repeat this step on the right foot as well.
  • 8. Next, the toenails should be clipped and use caution in the process. Make sure your nails clippers have been disinfected, and do not cut directly into the corners of your client's toenails.
  • 9. Toe separators have been recommended in some states to use during the nail filing and pushing back cuticle process and/or cuticle treatment process, however, check with your State Board of Cosmetology to verify whether or not you are required to use toe separators.
  • 10. Toenail filing is the next step, as you need to file the toenail straight across with an emery board or a sanding grit nail file. Be cautious a nail file, because you can mistakenly file a portion of your clients toe. Again, file straight across the toenail and slightly round the corners, so there will be no sharp edges on the toenails. You can also use a light sanding buffer to take out any strong ridges that may be evident in the toenail structure. Reminder: You may use the left foot/right foot process as far as the service & step order is concerned, as well as the small toe to big toe pattern in your spa pedicure steps too.
  • 11. The callus and dry skin buildup on your client's feet now need to be removed.
  • a. This buildup is usually on the underside of the foot within the heel and ball regions. This buildup can be removed with a foot file. Therefore, you should grab the left foot and cradle your client's ankle in your hand. From this vantage point, you can hold and turn the foot slightly and file. The right foot can remain in the foot spa, as you file the left foot. After filing the left foot, you can then place back in the foot spa and repeat the filing steps with the right foot.
  • b. Using back and forward motions, begin to file the feet and you should see callus buildup and skin start falling from the feet. Use your judgment in regard to how much filing to perform.
  • c. Reminder: Depending upon the State Board of Cosmetology, you have to use the board-approved foot file. This foot file may be an abrasive sanding file that is similar to a nail file with a grit surface, or it may be a metal file that can be disinfected after pedicure uses.
  • 12. Nail brushing is the next step, whereas a nail brush is used in straight across motions to brush the toenails. This process can assist with removing debris from the toes and cleaning the cuticles.
  • 13. Cuticle treatments are next and usually, a cuticle solvent is used on the cuticles. As mentioned previously, many nail and pedicure product manufactures have "pedicure systems" that are available. These systems may already include a cuticle solvent as well. Take the left foot out of the water and set on the towel-covered foot rest (you can leave the right foot in the foot spa). To apply the solvent, a clean orangewood stick wrapped in cotton (or pre-made, cotton-tipped orangewood stick) can be used to apply the cuticle solvent. After you apply the solvent to the left toe cuticle area, you can begin pushing back the cuticles. Make sure you read and are aware of how long the cuticle solution is to remain on the toes. Oftentimes, cuticle solvent works rapidly to soften cuticles. You may also add additional cuticle solvent under the free edge of the toenail, as debris and callus can be softened as well.
  • 14. As you push back the cuticle, you can use a State Board-approved metal instrument, such as a metal pusher, to push back the cuticles. You can also use an additional cotton-tipped orangewood stick. Gently push back the cuticles and don't push too hard to rupture the skin. You can then dip the foot in into the foot spa and brush the cuticles again with the nail brush. You may then insert the left foot back in the foot spa and perform the same process with the right foot. You can also use the cotton-tipped orangewood stick to gently go under the free edge to remove excess build up. It is highly recommended that when you work under the free edge, use an instrument that is coated with cotton, so you may not break the skin's natural barrier.
  • 15. Nipping the Cuticles and the Toenail (if applicable) - This process is sometimes used in the pedicuring process, depending upon the State Cosmetology Regulatory Board recommendations. This process involves taking small "nips" to remove excess cuticle, hangnail, and [the corners of] toenails that may plicatured (the toenail is compromised as it folds in the margin). Take caution in making small nips and make sure that you are able to see and that the lighting in your pedicure area is sufficient. Also, if nipping the corner of the toe nails, no not nip in too deep into the margin.

THE SPA FACTORS AND THE ULTIMATE SPA PEDICURE SERVICE CONTINUED:

SCRUBS & MASKS; HEEL TREATMENTS; PARRAFIN;

HAND MANIPULATION & FOOT MASSAGE

After pushing back the cuticles, you can then proceed with the additional "SPA FACTORS", or add-on services that distinguish your spa pedicure from a standard pedicure. Remember, aromatherapy has already been used in the foot soak, whether already incorporated in the soaking solution OR as you have put a few drops of essential oil in the foot spa.

  • D. Scrubs - Scrubs are excellent to use during the spa pedicure, because they have so many properties in their contents that aid in exfoliation and hydration. As Callus builds up on the bottom of the feet, the scrub can assist in removing dry skin that is a result of build up over time. During a spa pedicure, you can apply the scrub from the foot to below the knee. This is oftentimes different from a standard pedicure. From an exfoliation perspective, scrubs have contents such as - sea salts, sugar, pumice, and ground apricot kernels. From a hydration perspective, scrubs have contents such as - oils, or alpha hydroxy acids, that aid in softening the feet. Oftentimes, scrubs contain exfoliants and hydrants, to give a multipurpose effect. Therefore, your client's feet can be exfoliated and moisturized at the same time. In applying the scrubs, you need to do the following:
  • 1. Take the left foot out of the foot spa and lightly pat dry (you want the right foot to remain hydrated in the foot spa, so the scrub content will not be too abrasive when applied).
  • 2. Note: You can choose to now put on protective salon-grade plastic or latex gloves, to protect your hands from the abrasiveness of the scrub if you would like.
  • 3. Pat the left and foot and area below the knee slightly with a clean, cloth towel (leave overall area damp/dry). With a plastic spatula, take your product out of the manufacture's container (or you may have had prepared earlier in a covered spa dish) and use to apply on your client's feet and leg area below the knee (tibia & fibula area). You can then apply the scrub in a circular motion by making sure that you cover all areas of the foot and below the knee. Pay close attention to applying the scrub to the heels and the ball of the foot. The bottom of the feet should receive the most attention. When you are applying scrub, it is not the same as hand manipulation and massage. Remember, you don't want the abrasiveness of the scrub to be too harsh on your client's skin. After the application of the scrubs, you can place the foot back into the foot spa, and use your hands to wipe off the scrub from the leg. Note: You can also use a clean, lightly steamed cloth towel to remove the scrub material from your client. You can then repeat the same procedure with the right foot.
  • 4. Aromatherapy can also be utilized in the foot scrub process, and you can use drops of essential oils or an essential oil/carrier oil combination in the foot scrub product. Remember, a little goes a long way with essential oils and you only need to use a few drops.
  • E. Masks - Masks have long been associated with facials, however, they are proving more popular in the pedicure process. A mask can aid in various treatments for the feet with contents including - vitamins, amino acids, minerals, nutrients, sea extracts, and alpha hydroxy acids. When applying the mask to the feet, please note the following steps:
  • 1. Take both feet out of the foot spa and pat dry with a clean, cloth towel. *Note: You can also line the foot rest with a disposable, plastic covering that will keep the mask product from staining your pedicure station.
  • 2. Note: You can choose to put on protective salon-grade plastic or latex gloves as well, to protect your hands from the mask content.
  • 3. With a plastic spatula, take your product out of the manufacturer's container (or you may have had prepared earlier in a covered spa dish) and use to apply on your client's feet and just above the ankles. Using upward and downward strokes, you can apply the mask by making sure that you cover all areas of the foot and just above the ankle. Make sure you have full coverage of the mask product.
  • 4. After applying the mask product to both feet, you can then use a disposable plastic bag to cover the entire masking area. There are several manufactures that make plastic bags for the pedicure process. These bags are made long enough to cover the feet and ankles.
  • 5. Allow the mask to saturate for at least 5 minutes and then for removal, use a clean, lightly steamed cloth towel to remove the mask material from your client's feet.

  • F. Paraffin Dip & Wax Treatment - The paraffin wax treatment solidifies a spa pedicure, as it gives the feet the feeling of hydration, softness, and having been moisturized. This treatment is performed with paraffin wax, which is a product of petroleum (by-product), and this wax is usually fragranced. The heat of the paraffin wax traps the moisture in your client's feet and the end result usually produces feet that are very smooth to the touch. The paraffin wax treatment also aids with circulation as well. The paraffin wax is heated with a paraffin wax heater, and the wax should be heated from 125-130 degrees F. This treatment was originally used in the medical field via physical therapy, whereas patients with arthritis and joint problems would have a hot paraffin wax treatment. It is important to remember to follow the manufactuerer's instructions regarding paraffin wax and the wax heater. The paraffin wax treatment steps are as follows:
  • 1. Set up - Make sure you have the following items available for your paraffin wax treatment:
  • a. clean, cloth towels;
  • b. paraffin heater,
  • c. paraffin wax,
  • d. essential oils (for paraffin) are optional;
  • e. saran wrap or pedicure/paraffin plastic foot bags (may be sold with your paraffin wax set, or you can purchase separately); or saran wrap or plastic coverin
  • f. orangewood sticks
  • 2. The wax is in solid form and therefore, should be heated from 45 minutes to 1 hour, depending upon how much wax you are heating and the particular heater.
  • 3. You may also use essential oils again to promote aromatherapy. Just a few drops are all that's necessary. Additionally, your desired was may already have essential oils incorporated.
  • 4. It is important to note that during the paraffin wax treatment, depending upon the State Regulatory Board of Cosmetology, it may be or may not be permissible to "dip" the foot into the paraffin wax foot bath. This concern is because of sanitation and the importance of protecting your clients from bacteria and the possibility of infection. Technically, the heat of the wax is supposed to be hot enough to kill bacteria, however, "double dipping" is a concern and you should verify with your respective State Board of Cosmetology.
  • 5. For the scope of this course, cheese cloth or heavy, non-raveling gauze will be recommended to use for absorption of the paraffin and application to your clients feet during the spa pedicure.
  • 6. Spray your client's feet again with antiseptic foot spray.
  • 7. Take a small amount of moisturizing lotion and apply over the feet (top and bottom), the ankles, and a few inches above the ankles.
  • 8. Take a clean orangewood stick, and dip into the paraffin wax and test on your arm to gage the temperature. Make sure the temperature is not too hot. Remember: if the temperature is too hot for you, it is probably too hot for your client.
  • 9. Make sure [again] that both feet are rested on the towel-covered pedicure cushion, and that there is another fresh, clean plastic covering over the cushion (the covering will catch the paraffin wax).
  • 10. You may also use protective gloves if you choose to do so.
  • 11. Take a large swap of cheese cloth or gauze and dip into the paraffin. Make sure you leave about 2-3 inches whereas your hands and fingers (if bare) will not touch the wax in the paraffin warmer.
  • 12. Place cloth on foot, and use your hands to glide the cloth along your client's foot.
  • 13. Depending upon the size of the cloths, make sure the entire foot (top and bottom), as well as the heels and ankles are covered with the paraffin dipped cloth.
  • 14. Then take plastic wrap or a pedicure plastic bag and wrap around the paraffin.
  • 15. Take a "paraffin foot mitt" and place over the plastic. If you don't have an official paraffin foot mitt, you can take a large size cloth towel (or two smaller towels) and carefully wrap around your client's feet (similar to a cocoon).
  • 16. Repeat theses steps with the other foot as well.
  • 17. The paraffin should remain on the feet for 10-15 minutes.
  • 18. For paraffin removal, using one foot a time, you can remove the towel, gently remove the plastic bag or plastic wrap, and roll the paraffin off the feet (the paraffin will oftentimes will roll right off with the plastic).
  • 19. Discard the paraffin and plastic and remove the towels as well.
  • 20. Now the feet should feel very smooth to the touch and your client should be very pleased.
  • G. Heel Treatments
  • 1. Heel treatments are essential for an ultimate spa pedicure as well. The balls and heels of the feet have to carry our bodies as we live our daily routine. These areas are susceptible to having more rough skin, and treating the heel can make a big difference in the way your client's feet look and feel.
  • 2. There are professional beauty manufacturer's heel treatments that are created to provide intense moisture to the heel area and they often come with a spa pedicure product system. It is wise to research and compare various pedicure systems, and to become educated via continuing education and/or directly from the product manufacturer.
  • 3. Ultimately, various heel treatments may come in a cream or oil-based form, and the treatment can be applied at the end of the spa pedicure, after lotion is applied.
  • 4. The treatment is applied just as lotion would be applied, and you can take a quarter-size of product, and apply to your client's heels and rub in. Make sure you wipe off excess product when you are finished.
  • 5. Note: Make sure you read the manufacturer's instructions regarding the application of the heel treatment product. Some heel treatments are safe to rub over the heels and feet. Other treatments may recommend to be used on the heels only.
  • H. Hand Manipulation and Foot Massage - Introduction
  • 1. It is important to note that a Cosmetologist's license or a Manicurist's license is not a Massage Therapy license (and vice versa). However, within the realm of Nail Technology, Cosmetologists and Manicurists are allowed to deliver hand manipulation/massage techniques to the hands and feet - to a certain degree. Therefore, for the scope of this course, there will be a review of massage, effleurage, petrissage, and tapotement, within the spa pedicure procedure.
  • 2. Massage - According to the Medline Plus Medical Dictionary, the word "massage" denotes the " . . . manipulation of tissues (as by rubbing, stroking, kneading, or tapping) with the hand or an instrument especially for therapeutic purposes." Massage, or "hand manipulation" can be incorporated in several salon-related services, and is known for its increase of circulation and blood flow. Hand manipulation, from a nail technology perspective can be utilized within the manicure and pedicure service. Since the cosmetology field allows touch and feeling, it almost comes natural to perform hand manipulation within a service.
  • 3. Effleurage - When using hand manipulation, you can perform effleurage, which includes movements that can be hard or light. These movements are stroking movements and help to improve circulation and relax muscles. Blood flow to the heart is also suggested to be even better with effleurage.
  • 4. Petrissage - When needing the feet and providing friction, this can be considered petrissage. Squeezing is also involved where ultimately, petrissage is performed with compression movements. These movement involve muscle stretching, and the tendons can be stretched as well.
  • 5. Tapotement - This is an additional form of massage technique where stimulation and increase of circulation is involved. Tapotement involves tapping, where percussion-like movements are performed.
  • I. Hand Manipulation and Foot Massage During the Spa Pedicure
  • 1. Make sure that during the hand manipulation process, you talk with your client regarding how she or he feels. You want to make sure that you don't apply too much pressure and make your client feel uncomfortable. As mentioned previously, pay close attention to your client's health needs and make sure you monitor this process.
  • 2. While using one foot at a time, first make sure the foot and ankle are clean of any debris and product that you may have used during the ultimate spa pedicure (especially kernels from scrubs).
  • 3. You may place your client's foot on the towel-covered foot rest, and hold the client's foot under the ankle in one hand, and in the other hand, begin to gently rotate your client's foot in a circular motion. This will loosen and relax the joints for deeper hand manipulation.

SalonSpaPediRoom.jpg

  • 4. Petrissage - When kneeding the feet and providing friction, this can be considered petrissage. Squeezing is also involved where ultimately, petrissage is performed with compression movements. These movement involve muscle stretching, and the tendons can be stretched as well. Again, Petrissage can be considered as "kneading."
  • 5. Tapotement - This is an additional form of massage technique where stimulation and increase of circulation is involved. Tapotement involves tapping, where percussion-like movements are performed.

 

  • I. Hand Manipulation and Foot Massage During the Spa Pedicure
  • 1. Make sure that during the hand manipulation process, you talk with your client regarding how she or he feels. You want to make sure that you don't apply too much pressure and make your client feel uncomfortable. As mentioned previously, pay close attention to your client's health needs and make sure you monitor this process.
  • 2. While using one foot at a time, first make sure the foot and ankle are clean of any debris and product that you may have used during the ultimate spa pedicure (especially kernels from scrubs).
  • 3. You may place your client's foot on the towel-covered foot rest, and hold the client's foot under the ankle in one hand, and in the other hand, begin to gently rotate your client's foot in a circular motion. This will loosen and relax the joints for deeper hand manipulation.
  • 4. Effleurage can then be performed on the top and bottom of the feet. Again, these stroking movements can be done is a harder motion, or a lighter motion.
  • a. On the top of the feet, use your thumbs as your "hand manipulation tool." In a circular motion, you can begin at the instep (middle area of the foot between the ankles and toes that forms the arch of the foot) and massage downward toward the toes (make sure your right and left hand are rotating in the direction towards the outer part of the foot). Make sure your fingers cradle your client's feet to keep them guided throughout. You can continue to repeat this process between 3-5 times.
  • b. On the bottom of the feet, you can perform the same motions, just begin at the ball of the foot and use your thumbs to make circular motions downwards toward the heel. You can continue to repeat this process 3-5 times.
  • c. Effleurage can then be used on the toes, as you can start from the small toe, and move toward the big toe. With each toe, your thumb will be your massage tool, and your index finger will serve as the guide of support for the toe. Just make circular movements from the base area of the toe, towards the end of the toe. You can repeat this process as well at least 3-5 times/per toe.
  • 5. Just as the joint of the ankle was rotated at the beginning of hand manipulation, you can also rotate each toe. Be careful with your client's toes and according to Mix (2004), you can make a small figure 8 with each toe. It is your discretion how many times you would like to repeat this process. Between 2-4 times per toe is recommended by Rowland (2009).
  • 6. Friction can also be utilized as you would ball your hand into a fist with your thumb protruding (similar to a "thumbs up" position). On the bottom of the foot, use your fist and thumb to press hard and roll your fist and thumb up and down from the ball to the heel of the foot. This thumb compression is excellent for tension relief and the increased circulation of blood. You can repeat this process 2-4 times.
  • 7. Kneeding or Petrissage is another hand manipulation technique in which you can use the fingers of both hands and perform a "scissor movement" on the top of the feet. This movement involves your fingers being placed alongside the metatarsal bones and your thumbs can be used as a guide and support under your client's feet. Use your fingers to make diagonal upward and downward movements and apply pressure as well. This can be repeated 3-5 times as well and make sure you apply pressure to the top portion of the feet.
  • 8. Similar to the thumb compression, you can continue your friction movement by using your entire fist to provide friction into the bottom of the foot. Therefore, on the bottom of the foot, use your fist to press hard and roll your fist up and down from the ball to the heel of the foot. This total fist compression is excellent for tension relief and the increased circulation of blood. You can repeat this process 2-4 times. The switch from compression to kneading gives a different element of massage in which your client will not always feel the same movement.
  • 9. You can also repeat the effleurage massage on the instep of the foot again, providing those alternating massage movements, that are ultimately repetitious, but alternated to give a different element within the foot massage.
  • 10. Lastly, you can perform tapotement on the foot as well. Tapotement resembles are percussion-like movement, in which the fingers are used to tap on top of the foot from the instep to the toes. Tapotement is a very widely used massage technique that is excellent for the increase of blood flow and circulation. This massage technique requires much practice for some - but for others, the continuous tapping becomes natural.
  • 11. Please note that during the hand manipulation/massage process, if you massage above the ankle, check with your State Regulatory Board regarding how high above the ankle you can massage. If you are not a Massage Therapist, you may need to be careful working on portions of the body that are not part of your treatment area. In some States, hand manipulation and massage above the ankle may be permissible. Just make sure you check to be certain.
  • J. You can also choose to apply a soothing foot lotion over the entire feet and ankles. This can be soothing to your client as the ultimate spa pedicure process is near an end.
  • K. After the hand manipulation/foot massage and lotion application are complete, you can then make sure that all traces of oil are removed from the toenails.
  • L. Then allow the client to choose a polish color and if they need assistance, recommend something that complements their skin tone or a special occasion that they may attend.
  • M. Apply Polish - Apply your base coat, two coats of polish, and the top coat. Make sure you do not shake your polish bottle. Roll the polish bottle instead to minimize air bubbles emerging in the polish. You can use an instant nail dry after the polish or an electric nail dryer as well.

MODULE V (15 Min.):

POST-SERVICE, SANITATION, CLEAN UP

SPA PEDICURE BENEFITS FOR THE PEDICURIST AND THE CLIENT

CONCLUSION

Post-Service -

  • The post service involves making sure that your client was well-accommodated; assisting your client out of the pedicure chair with slippers provided by your salon or spa; or by assisting your client with putting on her or his shoes.
  • The post-service is also key for you to make another appointment with your client. After the ultimate spa pedicure, your client will hopefully be eager to see you again! It is always important to try to make another appointment immediately after your service. If your client does not want to make an appointment at that time, make sure you offer your business card and ask your client when it would be a good time to call them in the future.
  • You can also recommend retail products your client might like - such as the polish used during the ultimate spa pedicure, or a moisturizing foot lotion that you used as well.
  • Also provide answers that your client may have about the service, and possible advise you could give as your client's personal pedicurist.

Sanitation & Clean Up -

  • As mentioned earlier, sanitation is important before and after the spa pedicure service. Please note [again] sample requirements by the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners, in regard to foot spa sanitation (this course is for Ohio licensees, and this sanitation guide is for reference purposes only):

21 NCAC 14H .0120          FOOTSPA SANITATION

Manicurists and Cosmetologists shall use the following disinfection procedures to ensure proper cleaning and maintenance of any foot spa equipment and to prevent bacterial infection:

  • Between each customer a manicurist or cosmetologist shall:
  • drain all water and remove all debris from the foot spa;
  • clean and scrub the surfaces and walls of the foot spas with a scrub-brush and soap or detergent and rinse with clean, clear water; and
  • disinfect with an EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) and tuberculocidal disinfectant, used according to the manufacturer's instructions.
  • At the end of the day a manicurist or cosmetologist shall:
  • - remove the screen. All debris trapped behind the screen of each foot spa shall be removed, and the screen and the inlet shall be washed with soap or detergent and water;
  • - before replacing the screen wash the screen with a chlorine bleach solution of one part bleach to 10 parts water, or totally immerse the screen in an EPA registered disinfectant;
  • - fill the foot spa tub with five gallons of water and four cups of five per cent bleach solution; or
  • - disinfect with an EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal (bactericidal, virucidal, and fungicidal) and tuberculocidal disinfectant, used according to the manufacturer's instructions;
  • - circulate the solution through the foot spa system for no less than 10 minutes;
  • - let the solution sit overnight (at least six hours);
  • - drain and flush the system the following morning; and
  • - make a record of the date/time of this cleaning and disinfecting, on a form provided by the Board. The record for the last 90 days shall be accessible upon client or Board inspector request.

Additional Sanitation Procedures:

  • You should also make sure that your disposable items, such as cotton balls, orangewood sticks, plastic spatulas and the like should be thrown away.
  • The cotton towels used in during the pedicure should also be laundered per the State Regulatory Board requirements.
  • Also, your implements should be disinfected immediately. Don't forget to wash and brush your implements with warm, soapy water and to dry them as well. Make sure that your disinfection solution is mixed with water - per the manufacturer's instructions and that cuticle nippers, metal pushers, toe nail clippers, etc. are immersed in the solution properly (you can refer to the Sanitation & Disinfection portion of this course above for further detail).
  • Another form of post-service sanitation includes your spraying and wiping the manicure table and/or pedicure cart table top, the pedicurist's stool, the client's chair, and foot rest with an EPA registered disinfectant.

Benefits of Offering A Spa Pedicure -

As mentioned in the beginning of this course, one of the objectives is to: discuss the salon business benefits of a spa pedicure including signature service recognition, repeat clients, and increased financial rewards. Therefore, please note the following:

  • Signature Service Recognition - One the "word is out" that you are offering such a luxurious signature spa pedicure, your clients will commend the atmosphere, aromatherapy, time you have taken, paraffin service, soaks, scrubs and masks as well. Ultimately, the will hopefully rave about your technique, and the care you have given them. When you and/or your business promote a "signature service," it makes you "stand out" among many who offer pedicure services. This not only brings you recognition, but it is also good for your business and could ultimately increase clientele for others who work with you. With continued practice and bettering your craft, you will be regarded as an expert in this field. This will also generate repeat clients and will boost your financial rewards.
  • You always have to time yourself and to make sure you know your body, your drive, and even your limitations regarding how many services you can perform on a daily basis. However, if you can add one spa pedicure to your menu per day, you could increase your financial rewards. Ultimately, if you strive to be diverse in your service offering - your business should flourish.

CONCLUSION

  • In conclusion, please note that you can customize your "ultimate spa pedicure" to your specifications. You don't have to perform the mask, scrub, and paraffin in one pedicure setting - you may want to only perform either the mask or paraffin as a pedicure option. OR, you can include all the services mentioned in this course - just make sure that you monitor your client in regard to circulation and health issues, and skin issues as well.
  • The standard pedicure is a quality service, but the spa pedicure is a luxury service that can enhance your business. If you incorporate the services of: atmosphere, aromatherapy, time, paraffin, soaks/scrubs/masks, hand manipulation/foot massage, and heel treatments - then you have an extraordinary service that can be labeled as a "signature service" in your salon or spa.
  • You don't have to have a lot of money and/or space to incorporate the spa pedicure service at your salon. You can be creative and create a small space and atmosphere that can make your client feel pampered, along with offering - a beverage, magazine, and providing soft music can help as well.
  • Sanitation is imperative when offering pedicures at your salon or spa. Throughout this course, sanitation has been explained, and please follow the sanitation rules from your respective State Board of Cosmetology.
  • Make sure that you are considerate of your client's health and well being. When you have your initial client consultation, make sure you ask about various health-related issues such as: diabetes, circulation, blood pressure, and skin issues as well. Remember, you can always make a decision to refer your client to a doctor or medical professional if you feel they need assistance and you can't service them.
  • Make the spa pedicure your signature service, and remember that financial rewards can be enhanced with this service. If you are already performing a standard pedicure, by just adding a few additional services (particularly the paraffin wax and mask), you can increase your financial rewards.

 

 

CITATIONS USED

Bardley, C. (1999). Secrets of the Spas: Lotions, Potions, Oils, Rubs, Wraps, Scrubs, Masks, and Cuisine. Black Dog & Leventhal Publishers, Inc. New York, NY. 

Bloodborne Pathogens (2005). American Safety and Health Institute. Holiday, FL.

Cunningham, J. (2004). Aromatherapy, Chapter 13 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

Mix, G. (2004). Anatomy and Physiology, Chapter 6 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

Mix, G. (2004). The Nail and its Disorders, Chapter 7 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

Mix, L. (2004). Pedicuring Chapter 11 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

Moran, R. (2004). Sanitation and Disinfection, Chapter 3 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

Moran, R. (2004). Safety in the Salon, Chapter 4 in - Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

NIC Health and Safety Blood Spill Procedure (2002). National Interstate Council of State Boards of Cosmetology. Little Rock, AR.

The Ohio State Board of Cosmetology (2009). Grove City, Ohio.

Schultes, S. (2004). Editor, Milady's Standard Nail Technology. Delmar Learning. Clifton Park, NY.

WEB CITATIONS USED

http://www.aromaweb.com/

http://www.ashinstitute.org/

http://www.cartage.org.lb/

http://www.comcast.net/

http://www.eoearth.org/

http://www.epa.gov/

http://www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/mplusdictionary.html

http://www.nccosmeticarts.com/

www.nictesting.org/testing.htm

http://osha.gov/

http://www.sciencehelpdesk.com/

http://www.southwest-ortho.com/

http://www.universe-review.ca/

 

 

 

 

END OF COURSE EXAM

 

  • There is no passing grade for this 4-hr. Online course. However, the course curriculum must be read and there are five Modules (I-V) included in the course readings.  You also are required to take the end of course exam, and each question should be answered to receive a course completion certificate. Please answer each question to the best of your ability. Upon completion, you may submit your exam online by using the "Submit Exam" button.
  • This exam has a total of 40 multiple choice questions that derive from all course Modules (I-V). Please read and choose one answer that best fits the question. When you answer the questions, just click the "drop down button" and select your chosen answer by selecting "True" or "False".
  • Make sure you include your name, contact phone number, email address, your License type, and License number.

END OF COURSE EXAM - Please answer each question below, and submit your contact information as well (contact information must be included for exam submittal). Thank you.

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1. A pedicure performed by a licensed Manicurist or Cosmetologist involves professional care of the feet, toes, and nails. 

  2. The general procedures of a standard pedicure include hand manipulation/foot massage.
3. If your client is pleased with the spa pedicure, s/he will probably not refer other persons to you for your pedicure services.  
4. Sanitation is not a form of decontamination.
5. Disinfection is the second highest level of decontamination, because it controls microorganisms that grow on various implements used in the salon setting such as: metal cuticle pushers and toenail clippers.
6. Material Safety Data Sheets are required by OSHA, which stands for the U.S. Occupational Sanitation and Health Administration.
7. The Material Safety Data Sheet (MSDS) should include items such as Toxicological information, Ecological information and Disposal considerations.
8. If a blood spill should occur, the first step includes supplying the injured party with liquid styptic/antiseptic and the appropriate dressing to cover the injury.
9. Regarding sanitation, you should thoroughly wash your hands and the exposed portions of your arms with antibacterial soap and water before providing services to each client and after smoking, drinking, eating, and using the restroom.
10. If using a foot spa, after performing each pedicure, you need to drain all water and remove all debris from the foot spa; clean and scrub the surfaces and walls of the foot spas with a scrub-brush and soap or detergent and rinse with clean, clear water; and disinfect with an EPA registered, hospital/pseudomonacidal and tuberculocidal disinfectant, according to the manufacturer's instructions.
11. There are 28 bones in the foot and, three joints actually comprise our ankle, including the tibia and fibula, and the sole "ankle bone" known as the callus.
12. There are 206 bones that comprise our skeletal system.
13. Cartilage is a substance that is a very soft tissue. It is too soft to help joints connect.
14. The system that system controls our responses, feelings, and works in concert with the brain and the spine is the Muscular System.
15. The largest organ of the body is the skin, which is a part of the Integumentary System.
16. The Excretory System is responsible for excreting sweat and urine.
17. On average, a standard pedicure lasts between 45-60 minutes and a spa pedicure lasts approximately 30 minutes.
18. Concerning Aromatherapy, the various aromas derive from essential oils that are distilled from plant life including [but not limited to]: leaves, stems, flowers, bark, wood, and roots.
19. Grapeseed oil is one of the most popular carrier oils; and is a very light weight massage oil as well.
20. Before performing the spa pedicure, you must sanitize your manicure table and/or pedicure cart table with a State Board-approved sanitizer.
21. The Environmental Protection Agency is a private, non-federally regulated agency.
22. Before the spa pedicure, a health record form should be used during the consultation, where you should ask about any health-related issues including [but not limited to] - diabetes, skin conditions, medications, pregnancy, recent surgeries, and smoking history.
23. Before clipping your client's toenails, make sure your nails clippers have been disinfected, and do not cut directly into the corners of your client's toenails.
24. You do not have to use a State Board-approved foot file when performing a spa pedicure. Whether a metal file, callus shaver, or sanding file - you do not have to make sure that you are in compliance with Board regulations.
25. It usually takes a long time for cuticle solvent to work; therefore you can allow cuticle solvent to "sit and dissolve" on your client's cuticles for 15-20 minutes during the spa pedicure.
26. Scrubs used in the spa pedicure usually don't have exfoliants and hydrants combined.
27.  A mask can aid in various treatments for the feet with contents including - vitamins, amino acids, minerals, nutrients, sea extracts, and alpha hydroxy acids.
28. Paraffin wax is heated with a paraffin wax heater, and the wax should be heated from 125-130 degrees F.
29.  Various spa pedicure heel treatments may come in a cream or oil-based form.
30. Cosmetologists, Manicurists, and Massage Therapists can work under the exact same rules for massage and hand manipulation.
31. A spa pedicure foot soak may have essential oils already incorporated in the solution, such as sandalwood or tea tree oil.
32. When using hand manipulation, you can perform effleurage, which includes stroking movements that can be hard or light.
33. Effleurage can also be considered as "kneading."
34. A massage technique where stimulation and increase of circulation is involved, via tapping and percussion-like movements is called tapotement.
35. Throughout the spa pedicure process, it is important that you accommodate your client with care and professionalism, and make sure s/he is comfortable.
36. During the spa pedicure post service, it is not wise to ask your client when they would like to make another appointment for their spa pedicure. This would make your client feel as if you were too eager to service them again.
37. During the spa pedicure post-service, make sure that your disposable items, such as cotton balls, orangewood sticks, plastic spatulas are thrown away. 
38. You can customize your "ultimate spa pedicure" to your specifications. You don't have to perform the mask, scrub, and paraffin in one pedicure setting - you may want to only perform either the mask or paraffin as a pedicure option.
39. A spa pedicure can be a very relaxing feeling for your client that boosts self esteem as well.
40. You do not need a lot of money to promote a relaxing atmosphere for the ultimate spa pedicure. With the addition of soft music, a beverage, and a magazine - you can make your client feel as if they are receiving an "upscale service."

END OF EXAM.

You may now submit your exam by clicking the "Submit Exam" button (below left).  Upon payment confirmation and receiving your exam, your test results and course completion certificate will be emailed to you the same business day. If we receive your exam after 7:00 p.m. (EST), your certificate and results will be emailed to you the next business day. Please make sure you have included your name, license type, State where licensed, license number, email address, and phone number with the submittal of your exam. Thank you for choosing The Salon Spa Training Institute as your Continuing Education Course Provider!

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